Jarvis Landry carries big fantasy risk for 2016

The Miami receiver has put up numbers largely because he's been given so many chances. Mike Tagliere wonders if his per-touch numbers can improve.

| 7 months ago
(Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

(Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

Jarvis Landry carries big fantasy risk for 2016


One of the most debatable subjects this offseason is whether Miami Dolphins wide receiver Jarvis Landry is actually a good fantasy football player. This isn’t about him as an actual NFL player, because we think he fills his role better than the average player would. Just know that everything you see with your eyes is subjective, while numbers are not.

Landry gained traction in the fantasy community his rookie year when he totaled 84 receptions for 758 yards and five touchdowns. While impressive, Landry had a bigger role than most know. He totaled 112 targets, which ranked 31st in the league, despite being a part-time player for the first four games.

There were plenty of fantasy owners that loved him heading into 2015 fantasy drafts, saying that his targets would only go up due to the lack of playmakers around him. There were also the people that said he would only produce due to volume, and lacked any upside.

Before getting into the specifics and breakdown of Landry’s first two seasons, I’ll admit that I was on the “needs tons of volume to live up to the WR2 status” side of the argument. But again, this isn’t a place for opinion – this is a place to look at raw numbers.

Playing like an old man

It’s without a doubt that Landry is an elite athlete, but then again, 90 percent of the guys that are in the NFL are as well – maybe more. He is actually bigger than he looks on the field, at 5-11 and 205 pounds. He is bigger than Antonio Brown, Doug Baldwin, Brandin Cooks, Emmanuel Sanders, and slightly bigger than Odell Beckham Jr.

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Mike Tagliere is a Lead Writer for PFF Fantasy. He's ranked as a top-six fantasy football expert twice over the last four years by FantasyPros.com.

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  • Paradox

    “Just know that everything you see with your eyes is subjective, while numbers are not”. False, numbers can be tortured to say anything we want. If numbers were flawless, NFL teams wouldn’t need scouts.

    • Vic Hedges

      True, ANYBODY with ANY experience using statistics ought to know this. It’s like saying our current 5% unemployment rate means we have a strong job market.

  • Ryan

    When looking at Jarvis Landry’s workout numbers coming out of college, I definitely do doubt him as an elite athlete, haha.

    4.77 40 yd dash (4.61 at his pro day); 28.5 in vertical (31.5 at pro day); 110 in broad (113 in at pro day); 7.56 3 cone and 4.59 short shuttle at pro day.

    All of those numbers are well below average (or downright poor) when compared to typical starting (or even backup) wrs in the NFL . . . elite wr skills, ill give you that. but an elite athlete, I don’t think so.

    • FantasySubs

      Thanks for that info! He does have elite catching ability but I had not looked up his workout numbers.

  • Joel Brody

    WHERE THE F IS THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE? I swear, you can’t access all of the content even after logging in. Then you spend 5 mins trying to refresh to see if the article shows up. But hey, I can read the first paragraph AND the comments. Kind of funny there are so much analytics going on here, yet you guys can’t get basic web pages to load properly Grade F……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF