Live Day 3 draft analysis from the PFF team

The PFF analysis team will be providing pick-by-pick commentary, as well as updates on the latest Day 3 news.

| 4 weeks ago
2017 NFL Draft

(Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images)

Live Day 3 draft analysis from the PFF team


Last night, Rounds 2 and 3 of the 2017 NFL Draft ushered in a new pool of talent. Be sure to check out PFF’s analysis for every Thursday and Friday pick.

This afternoon, we dive headlong into Rounds 4 through 7. Be sure to stick with Pro Football Focus throughout the day for live coverage here as our team continues to react to every pick.

To see PFF’s list of the best players remaining entering Day 3, click here.


7:08 p.m ET, April 29

Denver Broncos

Round 7, pick No. 253 overall: Chad Kelly, QB, Ole Miss

Mr. Irrelevant is for once a well-known player, as Chad Kelly started at quarterback for Ole Miss each of the past two seasons. He played only 597 snaps in 2016, as he tore his ACL in Week 10. Kelly had a completion percentage of 78.1 percent when not under pressure, the eighth-highest mark in the QB class. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh

PFF QB Analyst Zac Robinson on Kelly: 

Chad Kelly’s arm talent is on par with the best in this year’s draft. He’s a confident thrower with natural power to any part of the field from any throwing position. He has a great feel for anticipating zone windows and back-shoulder throws on the sideline. Kelly is at his best with timing-and-rhythm throws or wth play-action within the offense. The confidence in his arm is a double-edged sword, as he forces many throws he should not attempt. Kelly is an enticing option to develop and work his way up an NFL depth chart.


7:05 p.m. ET, April 29

Cleveland Browns

Round 7, pick No. 252 overall: Matt Dayes, RB, N.C. State

Dayes is a physical back at his best, capable of converting short yardage and goal-line situations (10 touchdowns). He has an issue with ball security (fumbling three times last year), but was also highly productive, breaking 42 tackles in 2016.  John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


7:03 p.m. ET, April 29

Cincinnati Bengals

Round 7, pick No. 251 overall: Mason Schreck, TE, Buffalo

Schreck’s 1.75 yards per route run mark ranks 22nd among all FBS tight ends. Schreck added 269 yards after the catch in 2016. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


6:59 p.m. ET, April 29

Detroit Lions

Round 7, pick No. 250 overall: Pat O’Connor, Edge, Eastern Michigan

Pat O’Connor had a strong senior season in Ypsilanti, as he posted an 83.4 overall grade. He racked up nine sacks, eight hits and 18 QB hurries, but managed just 10 run stops in 2016. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


6:57 p.m. ET, April 29

Seattle Seahawks

Round 7, pick No. 249 overall: Chris Carson, RB, Oklahoma State

The Seahawks continue to add elusive runners to their backfield, selecting Chris Carson a year after they drafted C.J. Prosise. Carson broke a tackle once every 2.82 touches, the top mark in this class, also generating 3.9 yards after contact per carry and nine touchdowns.  John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


6:55 p.m. ET, April 29

Pittsburgh Steelers

Round 7, pick No. 248 overall: Keion Adams, Edge, Western Michigan

Adams had an excellent season in Kalamazoo last year, as he was a very productive pass-rusher for the Broncos. His 84.3 pass-rush ing grade ranked second among MAC edge players, and his 52 total QB pressures tied for the conference lead among 3-4 outside linebackers. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


6:52 p.m. ET, April 29

Green Bay Packers

Round 7, pick No. 247 overall: Malachi Dupree, WR, LSU

Dupre ran a limited route tree at LSU and will need to develop as a route-runner, but he was effective on vertical deep routes. He recorded 14 catches on targets 20-plus yards downfield — including five touchdowns — over the past two seasons, but also dropped three passes. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


6:50 p.m. ET, April 29

Dallas Cowboys

Round 7, pick No. 246 overall: Jordan Carrell, DI, Colorado

Carrell was one piece of a very talented defense at Colorado. He played right defensive end and collected five sacks, 10 QB hits, and 15 hurries on his 427 pass-rushing snaps in 2016. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


6:47 p.m. ET, April 29

Minnesota Vikings

Round 7, pick No. 245 overall: Jack Tocho, CB, N.C. State

The Vikings got strong value with this pick, as Tocho ranked 176th on our big board. His speed and size allowed him to break up seven passes while also intercepting two, and he only allowed a completion percentage of 50.0 on throws into his coverage last year.— Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


6:44 p.m. ET, April 29

Oakland Raiders

Round 7, pick No. 244 overall: Treyvon Heston, DI, Toledo

Hester is a solid developmental defensive tackle, offering upside as a pass-rusher and against the run. He ranked 20th amongst this class’ defensive tackles in pass-rushing productivity and 12th in run-stop percentage.  John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


6:42 p.m. ET, April 29

Houston Texans

Round 7, pick No. 243 overall: Kyle Fuller, C, Baylor

Kyle Fuller had an excellent year in pass protection last year for Baylor. He allowed just seven total QB pressures, which ranked second among draft-eligible centers. None of those pressures came on 5- or 7-step dropbacks. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


6:39 p.m. ET, April 29

Oakland Raiders

Round 7, pick No. 242 overall: Elijah Hood, RB, North Carolina

Hood’s 2015 tape is very impressive, as the big back averaged 4.1 yards after contact, tied for the nation-high mark among backs with at least 100 carries. He wasn’t quite as effective the following year, but still averaged 3.8 yards after contact and broke 47 tackles. If he gets back to his 2015 season form, Hood will be an effective power back that can spell Marshawn Lynch — even if he may be limited to just an early-down role. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


6:37 p.m. ET, April 29

Tennessee Titans

Round 7, pick No. 241 overall: Khalfani Muhammad, RB, California

Muhammad has been a dangerous open-field runner for years in the Pac-12. Muhammad forced 22 missed tackles as a runner on his 152 rushing attempts in 2016. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


6:34 p.m. ET, April 29

Jacksonville Jaguars

Round 7, pick No. 240 overall: Marquez Williams, FB, Miami (FL)

The Hurricanes’ propensity for 11-personnel limited Williams’ snaps in 2016 (169), but he was effective when he was on the field. Williams earned a positive grade on 17.9 percent of his run-blocking snaps in 2016, the third-highest rate in this FB class.  John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


6:30 p.m. ET, April 29

Dallas Cowboys

Round 7, pick No. 239 overall: Noah Brown, WR, Ohio State

Noah Brown was a solid run blocker for the Buckeyes in each of the past two seasons, and had a standout game against Oklahoma in 2016. He racked up four touchdowns in that game, showing the ability to outplay defenders in the air for the ball. He had three drops on 35 catchable balls last season, but forced eight missed tackles after the catch. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


6:28 p.m. ET, April 29

Green Bay Packers

Round 7, pick No. 238 overall: Devante Mays, RB, Utah State

The Packers drafted a third running back in Devante Mays. He played just 64 offensive snaps in 2016, with his best game coming against Weber State in Week 1 as he forced seven missed tackles on 18 rushes for 208 yards. In 2015, Mays forced 24 missed tackles on 165 carries as he came up 19 yards shy of 1,000 rushing yards. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


6:27 p.m. ET, April 29

Miami Dolphins

Round 7, pick No. 237 overall: Isaiah Ford, WR, Virginia Tech

Ford fails to wow in any one area, but he’s a reliable route runner with strong hands and body control. He dropped only 18 passes out of 228 catchable balls, collecting close to 3,000 yards and 24 touchdowns. Although Ford is not particularly athletic, he enters the league as one of the more refined receivers in this class.  John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


6:22 p.m. ET, April 29

Tennessee Titans

Round 7, pick No. 236 overall: Brad Seaton, OT, Villanova

The Titans already have talented book-end tackles, so Seaton will likely be trying to compete for the back-up swing-tackle role. Seaton has played three games against FBS opponents over the last three seasons and allowed two sacks, four hits, and 13 hurries. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


6:20 p.m. ET, April 29

Washington Redskins

Round 7, pick No. 235 overall: Joshua Holsey, CB, Auburn

Joshua Holsey was drafted by the Redskins in the seventh round off a strong 2016 campaign. He gave up a completion percentage of just 48.1 on throws into his coverage last season while defending a total of eight passes, and recorded a QB rating against of just 49.3. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


6:18 p.m. ET, April 29

Los Angeles Rams

Round 7, pick No. 234 overall: Ejuan Price, Edge, Pittsburgh

Ejuan Price is one of PFF’s highest-rated prospects still available on the board late in Day 3. Price is our 80th-ranked player in the class; he is an undersized but highly productive edge rusher. The former Pitt Panther racked up 16 sacks, 13 hits, and 39 hurries on his 498 pass-rushing snaps in 2016. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


6:16 p.m. ET, April 29

Carolina Panthers

Round 7, pick No. 233 overall: Harrison Butker, K, Georgia Tech

The Panthers miss out on Zane Gonzalez, but add a kicker in Round 7 still. He connected on every field goal he attempted from 40 yards and beyond in 2016. — Gordon McGuinness, @PFF_Gordon


6:14 p.m. ET, April 29

Minnesota Vikings

Round 7, pick No. 232 overall: Elijah Lee, LB, Kansas State

The Vikings have waded into Big 12 waters for a linebacker in the seventh round. Kansas State’s Elijah Lee notched 44 total stops in 2016, which ranked third among all linebackers in the conference. While he struggled in coverage, he added 10 sacks and nine QB hits in the past three seasons for the Wildcats. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


6:12 p.m. ET, April 29

Oakland Raiders

Round 7, pick No. 231 overall: Jylan Ware, OT, Alabama State

The Raiders snag a small-school tackle late in the draft. Jylan Ware only played one game versus a FBS opponent in 2016 (UTSA) and didn’t allow a single pressure on his 32 pass-blocking snaps. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


6:08 p.m. ET, April 29

Round 7, pick No. 230 overall: Josh Harvey-Clemons, S, Louisville

Washington Redskins

After shifting their hybrid linebacker to safety full-time this offseason (Su’a Cravens), Washington come right back to draft his replacement. Harvey-Clemons is at his best in the box, where he can use his aggression to his advantage. In 2016, he managed a run-stop percentage of 6.6, which ranked fifth in the class. He could stand to develop his instincts, and needs to work on his coverage skills, but Harvey-Clemons has plenty of potential.  John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


6:04 p.m. ET, April 29

San Francisco 49ers

Round 7, pick No. 229 overall: Adrian Colbert, DB, Miami (FL)

Colbert played in just seven games for Miami in 2016, lining up almost exclusively at outside corner. He picked off one pass, broke up three others, and allowed just one score. Colbert also allowed an average of just 2.7 yards after the catch, tied for the 10th-lowest average in the cornerback class. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


6:02 p.m. ET, April 29

Dallas Cowboys

Round 7, pick No. 228 overall: Joey Ivie, DI, Florida

There’s no denying Ivie’s limitations, but he represents a dependable nose tackle previously lacking in Dallas. In limited snaps, he generated 16 stops, and is competent when required to hold the point of attack against double-teams. Ivie earned a PFF overall grade of 80.0 last season.  John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


6:00 p.m. ET, April 29

Tennessee Titans

Round 7, pick No. 227 overall: Josh Carraway, Edge, TCU

Carraway looks to provide depth behind Brian Orakpo after taking 100 percent of his snaps off the right side in 2016. He needs to improve his consistency, but tends to make big plays when he is successful as a pass-rusher, converting 25 percent of his QB pressures into sacks.  John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


5:58 p.m. ET, April 29

Seattle Seahawks

Round 7, pick No. 226 overall: David Moore, WR, East Central

David Moore flashed NFL measurables at his pro day, as he measured 6-foot, 219 pounds, while running a 4.43-second 40-yard dash. He posted 33 touchdowns in three seasons at East Central in Oklahoma. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


5:54 p.m. ET, April 29

Los Angeles Chargers logo header

Round 7, pick No. 225 overall: Isaac Rochell, DI, Notre Dame

Rochell’s pass-rushing productivity rating of 7.0 ranks 32nd among interior defensive linemen in the draft class. Rochell generated consistent pass-rush production all week long at the Senior Bowl in Mobile, grading well in practices and collecting one QB hit and one hurry on his 16 pass-rushing snaps in the game. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


5:50 p.m. ET, April 29

Cleveland Browns

Round 7, pick No. 224 overall: Zane Gonzalez, K, Arizona State

The Browns stop the slide for PFFs highest-graded kicker in 2016, as Zane Gonzalez finds a home in Cleveland. With a booming leg, only Baltimore’s Justin Tucker can claim to have kicked more field goals of 50-plus yards in 2016 in either college or the NFL, as Gonzalez put seven such attempts through the uprights. — Gordon McGuinness, @PFF_Gordon


5:48 p.m. ET, April 29

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Round 7, pick No. 223 overall: Stevie Tu’ikolovatu, DI, USC

Tampa Bay has been searching for a space-eating nose tackle next to Gerald McCoy for multiple seasons, and they’ve finally found their solution. Tu’ikolovatu generated only 13 QB pressures last season (one knockdown), but dominated against the ground game. He totaled 37 defensive stops without missing a tackle, ranking second in the class with a run-stop percentage of 12.6.  John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


5:45 p.m. ET, April 29

Jacksonville Jaguars

Round 7, pick No. 222 overall: Jalen Myrick, CB, Minnesota

At this point in the draft, Myrick is nearly worth a pick based on his 4.28-second 40-speed alone. He is underrated in coverage though, as he ranked among the top 11 cornerbacks in the draft class in both PFF coverage grade and pass breakups. He may struggle with bigger receivers, but at the very least, he has potential as a slot cornerback. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


5:40 p.m. ET, April 29

Oakland Raiders

Round 7, pick No. 221 overall: Shalom Luani, S, Washington State

Luani had some issues as a tackler at Washington State, but flashed NFL ability in coverage. On 97 targets, he allowed only 59 catches for 650 yards, with eight picks and six pass deflections. He allowed only 44.1 percent of passes into his coverage to be converted into a first down (17th in class). If he can improve his form, the Raiders could have a seventh-round steal.  John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


5:38 p.m. ET, April 29

Minnesota Vikings

Round 7, pick No. 220 overall: Ifeadi Odenigbo, Edge, Northwestern

Ifeadi Odenigbo was a strong pass-rusher in 2016 for Northwestern. His 84.1 pass-rush grade ranked fifth among Big Ten edge defenders, and his overall pass-rushing productivity mark ranked fourth in the conference. He had possibly the best stretch of back-to-back games in the country as far as edge production in 2016, as he racked up a total of six sacks and 10 hurries against Iowa and Michigan State in Week 5 and 7. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


5:35 p.m. ET, April 29

Minnesota Vikings

Round 7, pick No. 219 overall: Stacy Coley, WR, Miami (FL)

Stacy Coley hears his name soon after his college quarterback is selected. Although there is some inconsistency in his game, Coley is an elusive and versatile wideout capable of manning the slot (75.7 percent catch rate was 11th in the class) or the perimeter. He caught nine touchdowns (also breaking nine tackles) on his 63 receptions in 2016. John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


5:31 p.m. ET, April 29

Kansas City Chiefs

Round 6, pick No. 218 overall: Leon McQuay III, S, USC

Leon McQuay III either intercepted or knocked down 20.5 percent of the passes thrown his way in 2016. He played 182 of his 410 coverage snaps in the slot in 2016. McQuay’s 86.3 coverage grade ranked eighth among all FBS safeties last season. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


5:28 p.m. ET, April 29

Tennessee Titans

Round 6, pick No. 217 overall: Corey Levin, G, Tennessee-Chattanooga

Corey Levin is an excellent athlete out in space, and was strong in pass protection against FBS teams. In three seasons, he did not give up a single sack or QB hit against an FBS opponent, which included Alabama this past season. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


5:26 p.m. ET, April 29

Dallas Cowboys

Round 6, pick No. 216 overall: Marquez White, CB, Florida State

The Cowboys have committed entirely to rebuilding their secondary in a draft well-suited to that strategy. White has upside, allowing a QB rating of only 64.8 into his coverage over three years at FSU, but he has a tendency to give up big plays and struggles around the line of scrimmage. A pick on potential makes sense at the back end of round six. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


5:23 p.m. ET, April 29

Detroit Lions

Round 6, pick No. 215 overall: Brad Kaaya, QB, Miami (FL)

We rated Brad Kaaya sixth among quarterbacks in the draft class, thus Detroit got excellent value with this pick late in the sixth round. When he had a clean pocket at Miami in 2016, he threw for 24 touchdowns and just five interceptions, and recorded a QB rating of 113.0. His 102.9 overall QB rating ranked ninth in the draft class. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


5:18 p.m. ET, April 29

Philadelphia Eagles

Round 6, pick No. 214 overall: Elijah Qualls, DI, Washington

Elijah Qualls is an intriguing defensive linemen who can play anywhere on the line, but is likely best-suited to a 3-technique defensive tackle role. Qualls can generate an interior pass-rush and had four sacks, two QB hits, and 29 hurries on his 324 pass-rushing snaps in 2016. Qualls’ pass-rushing productivity rating of 10.0 ranks 12th among all interior defensive linemen in the draft class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


5:16 p.m. ET, April 29

Pittsburgh Steelers

Round 6, pick No. 213 overall: Colin Holba, LS, Louisville

It might have taken until Round 6, but the first long snapper is off the board! Holba missed just one tackle in punt coverage in 2016, and had a solid week in Mobile for the Senior Bowl. — Gordon McGuinness, @PFF_Gordon


5:13 p.m. ET, April 29

Green Bay Packers

Round 6, pick No. 212 overall: Kofi Amichia, OT, USF

Kofi Amichia excelled at pass protection in 2016 and only allowed two sacks, one QB hit, and six hurries on his 403 pass-blocking snaps. Amichia’s pass-blocking efficiency rating of 98.2 ranks fifth in the draft class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


5:11 p.m. ET, April 29

New England Patriots

Round 6, pick No. 211 overall: Conor McDermott, OT, UCLA

Conor McDermott is a massive offensive tackle who measured over 6-foot-8 at the combine and has 343/4-inch arms. His 97.4 overall pass-blocking efficiency score ranked just 18th in the tackle class last year, but he gave up zero pressures on 7-step drops. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


5:05 p.m. ET, April 29

Seattle Seahawks

Round 6, pick No. 210 overall: Justin Senior, OT, Mississippi State

Senior was our target for a late-round option for addressing the Seahawks’ tackle need due to fitting almost exactly what Seattle looks for on the offensive line. He’s very athletic and best in a zone-run blocking scheme, but will need some technique improvement to reach his high ceiling. He ranked 15th in pass-blocking efficiency among draft-eligible tackles, but playing in Mississippi State’s spread offense means transitioning to the NFL will be a significant adjustment in pass protection. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


5:01 p.m. ET, April 29

Washington Redskins

Round 6, pick No. 209 overall: Robert Davis, WR, Georgia State

Robert Davis is a big target at 6-foot-3 and 219 pounds. Davis also has good deep speed and ran a 4.44-second 40-yard dash at the combine. He racked up 402 yards after the catch in 2016. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


4:59 p.m. ET, April 29

Arizona Cardinals

Round 6, pick No. 208 overall: Rudy Ford, S, Auburn

Johnathan Ford played primarily in the slot last season for Auburn, but is projected by some to transition to safety at the next level. In his last two seasons with the Tigers he gave up just one touchdown will picking off two passes and breaking up another five. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


4:57 p.m. ET, April 29

Cincinnati Bengals

Round 6, pick No. 207 overall: Brandon Wilson, CB/RB, Houston

Wilson played both running back and cornerback at Houston, but is likely a slot cornerback for the Bengals. He only allowed 13 catches for 196 yards and one TD when lined up in the slot in 2016. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


4:55 p.m. ET, April 29

Los Angeles Rams

Round 6, pick No. 206 overall: Sam Rogers, FB, Virginia Tech

Sam Rogers is a versatile fullback who split snaps between receiver, tight end, halfback, and fullback. He earned a positive grade on 15.1 percent of his run-blocking snaps in 2016, the sixth-highest rate in this FB class. He also led the draft class with an 85.0 pass-protection grade. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


4:52 p.m. ET, April 29

Detroit Lions

Round 6, pick No. 205 overall: Jeremiah Ledbetter, Edge, Arkansas

Ledbetter has experience playing all over the defensive line and is a bit of a “tweener,” but will fit as a base defensive end who can kick inside in sub-packages. He shows explosion off the ball on film, but it’s inconsistent and doesn’t always translate into production. His 5.9 pass-rushing productivity mark ranked 50th in the draft class. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


4:49 p.m. ET, April 29

New York Jets

Round 6, pick No. 204 overall: Derrick Jones, CB, Ole Miss

Derrick Jones was a wide receiver at Mississippi until this past year when he transitioned to cornerback and started three games. He gave up a completion percentage of 51.9 on throws into his coverage and broke up five total passes in 2016. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


4:45 p.m. ET, April 29

Denver Broncos

Round 6, pick No. 203 overall: De’Angelo Henderson, RB, Coastal Carolina

Henderson was a touchdown machine for Coastal Carolina, finishing his college career by finding the end zone in 35 consecutive games. He did not play a game against an FBS opponent in the past three seasons, and his only action against higher-level opponents was at the NFLPA game, where he had one carry for 14 yards and one catch for 7 yards. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


4:44 p.m. ET, April 29

San Francisco 49ers

Round 6, pick No. 202 overall: Pita Taumoepenu, Edge, Utah

Taumoepenu is a highly effective pass-rusher who has consistently produced pressure when on the field. In 2016, Taumoepenu had 10 sacks, nine QB hits, and 33 hurries on his 382 pass-rushing snaps. Taumoepenu’s 15.9 pass-rushing productivity rating on third downs ranks 30th among edge-rushers. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


4:42 p.m. ET, April 29

Minnesota Vikings

Round 6, pick No. 201 overall: Bucky Hodges, TE, Virginia Tech

Bucky Hodges is not a traditional in-line tight end, as he lined up on the line of scrimmage for just 17 out of 915 snaps last season. However, his production since 2014 is unmatched by the rest of the tight end class, as he led in snaps in route (1,112), targets (238), receptions (133), and yards (1,755). — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


4:38 p.m. ET, April 29

New York Giants

Round 6, pick No. 200 overall: Adam Bisnowaty, OT, Pittsburgh

Bisnowaty was one of the better run blockers in college back in 2014, but he’s regressed each of the last two years as Pittsburgh made some changes to run blocking schemes. He’s not quite quick enough to succeed in the zone-blocking scheme, and better suited for a gap-scheme, but will need some improvement there, too. As for pass protection, he ranked 21st in the class with a 97.3 pass-blocking efficiency. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


4:36 p.m. ET, April 29

Washington Redskins

Round 6, pick No. 199 overall: Chase Roullier, C, Wyoming

Chase Roullier was among our highest-graded remaining players in the draft, as we feel he has starting-caliber traits and production. In 882 pass-blocking reps over the past two seasons, he gave up just one sack and two hits. Last year he ranked fifth among draft-eligible centers in pass-blocking efficiency, and sixth in run-blocking success. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


4:32 p.m. ET, April 29

San Francisco 49ers

Round 6, pick No. 198 overall: D.J. Jones, DI, Ole Miss

Jones is a shorter defensive tackle at 6-foot-1, which, when combined with his low pad level, gives him a natural leverage advantage over taller blockers. Jones’ run-defense grade in 2015 was 84.1, but fell to 80.4 in 2016. Jones can play rotational snaps on the interior of the 49ers’ defensive line, and if he can generate a more consistent pass-rush, could possibly push for a larger role. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


4:30 p.m. ET, April 29

New York Jets

Round 6, pick No. 197 overall: Jeremy Clark, CB, Michigan

Jeremy Clark was having a strong 2016 season as Michigan’s nickel cornerback until tearing an ACL in Week 4 against Colorado. In three seasons, he was targeted 52 total times in coverage and gave up just 24 receptions while breaking up nine total balls. He measured out at 6-foot-3 and 220 pounds at the combine, and could be a candidate to move to safety. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


4:28 p.m. ET, April 29

New Orleans Saints

Round 6, pick No. 196 overall: Al-Quadin Muhammad, Edge, Miami (FL)

Muhammad didn’t play in 2016 or 2014, so the Saints are relying on his film and production from 2015 in making this selection. Muhammad can provide edge-rush production, and his 41 total QB pressures in 2015 was second among ACC 3-4 OLBs. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


4:27 p.m. ET, April 29

Buffalo Bills

Round 6, pick No. 195 overall: Tanner Vallejo, LB, Boise State

Tanner Vallejo was used frequently as a nickel and dime linebacker in the slot, and also flashed the ability to rush the passer. His pass-rushing productivity mark ranked sixth among off-the-ball linebackers in the draft class. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


4:20 p.m. ET, April 29

Miami Dolphins

Round 6, pick No. 194 overall: Vincent Taylor, DI, Oklahoma State

Taylor fits along the defensive line as a 0 or 1-technique nose tackle, and was ranked among the top-five interior defenders available in the draft. He had the second-highest overall pass-rushing productivity (PRP) mark among draft-eligible interior defensive linemen, and the highest PRP on dropbacks that lasted longer than 2.6 seconds. He will need to improve against the run, though, where he was much more inconsistent. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


4:18 p.m. ET, April 29

Cincinnati Bengals

Round 6, pick No. 193 overall: Jordan Evans, LB, Oklahoma

Jordan Evans is a top athlete, but needs to become more physical against the run. He excelled in coverage last season, however, as his 87.1 coverage grade ranked fifth among off-ball linebackers in the draft class. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


4:16 p.m. ET, April 29

Carolina Panthers

Round 6, pick No. 192: Alex Armah, FB, West Georgia

Armah played both on offense and on defense at West Georgia. The Panthers likely have a distinct plan for where they want to use him — he can play fullback, tight end, and linebacker. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


4:13 p.m. ET, April 29

Dallas Cowboys

Round 6, pick No. 191: Xavier Woods, S, Louisiana Tech

Dallas traded up to steal easily the top remaining player on our draft board. Woods made big improvements to all facets of his game in 2016, as he yielded just one catch longer than 22 yards last year as opposed to six in 2015, while picking off five passes and posting a QB rating against of just 58.4. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


4:11 p.m. ET, April 29

Los Angeles Chargers logo header

Round 6, pick No. 190: Sam Tevi, OT, Utah

Tevi is the fourth offensive lineman from Utah to be selected in this draft. The Chargers needed offensive line help to try and protect Philip Rivers better than they did last season. Tevi only allowed two sacks, two QB hits, and 10 hurries on his 343 pass-blocking snaps in 2016. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


4:07 p.m. ET, April 29

Los Angeles Rams

Round 6, pick No. 189: Tanzel Smart, DI, Tulane

The Rams might just have found themselves a steal in Tanzel Smart atop the sixth-round. Although somewhat undersized, Smart has one of the most complete skill-sets in the class. He delivers with force on first contact, using powerful hands both against the run and as a bull-rusher. Smart ranked fifth in third-down pass-rushing productivity, registering 47 combined QB pressures in 2016, including 14 knockdowns. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


4:04 p.m. ET, April 29

Round 6, pick No. 188: Elijah McGuire, RB, UL-Lafayette

New York Jets

McGuire was one of my favorite running backs in 2014 when he led the nation in both elusive rating (127.5) and receiving yards per route run (2.73). He hasn’t quite reached that level in the two years since, but clearly has the potential to be an effective player as both a runner and a receiver in the NFL. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


4:02 p.m. ET, April 29

Seattle Seahawks

Round 6, pick No. 187: Mike Tyson, S, Cincinnati

The Seahawks keep drafting defensive backs. Mike Tyson had a 22.2 percent playmaker index score, which means he disrupted 22.2 percent of all passes thrown into his coverage last season; that mark ranks 11th-best in the cornerback class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


3:59 p.m. ET, April 29

Baltimore Ravens

Round 6, pick No. 186: Chuck Clark, S, Virginia Tech

The Ravens plan for life after Eric Weddle by selecting reliable, versatile, defensive back Chuck Clark. He can drop down and cover the slot or align inside the box and wreck plays around the line of scrimmage. Clark recorded solid grades both in coverage (82.5) and against the run (76.2). — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


3:58 p.m. ET, April 29

Cleveland Browns

Round 6, pick No. 185: Caleb Brantley, DI, Florida

Brantley was PFF’s No. 3 ranked interior defensive lineman in the class but he was pushed down in the draft due to off-the-field issues. Brantley is a quick 3-technique defensive tackle who can destroy both run plays and pass plays with his penetration into opposing backfields. Brantley’s pass-rushing productivity rating of 11.7 ranks No. 5 in the draft class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


3:56 p.m. ET, April 29

Philadelphia Eagles

Round 5, pick No. 184: Nathan Gerry, S, Nebraska

Gerry was an excellent run defender in the box for Nebraska, as he ranked fourth in run-stop percentage among all draft-eligible safeties. He also graded extremely well in coverage despite not being a top athlete, as his 90.7 coverage grade ranked second among all FBS safeties. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


3:54 p.m. ET, April 29

Kansas City Chiefs

Round 5, pick No. 183: Ukeme Eligwe, LB, Georgia Southern

Ukeme Eligwe struggles to defend out in space, but is capable of playing the run inside. He ranked 17th among inside linebackers in the draft class in pass-rush productivity with 11 total pressures. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


3:50 p.m. ET, April 29

Green Bay Packers

Round 5, pick No. 182: Aaron Jones, RB, UTEP

The Packers double-up at the running back spot with Aaron Jones. He has had injury issues during his college career, but when healthy has made an enormous impact and is an effective zone-runner. Jones had 28 breakaway runs (15-plus yards) that gained a whopping 996 yards for the third-highest breakaway percentage in the draft class. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


3:45 p.m. ET, April 29

New York Jets

Round 5, pick No. 181: Dylan Donahue, Edge, West Georgia

Dylan Donahue was a hyper-productive pass-rusher at West Georgia, as he totaled 25.5 sacks the last two seasons. He flashes to win with both power and speed, and looked the part athletically at the combine in March. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


3:43 p.m. ET, April 29

Minnesota Vikings

Round 5, pick No. 180: Danny Isidora, G, Miami (FL)

Danny Isidora was the No. 5 guard on PFF’s draft board. Isidora’s third-down pass-blocking efficiency rating of 99.4 ranks second among all guards in the class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


3:42 p.m. ET, April 29

Arizona Cardinals

Round 5, pick No. 179: T.J. Logan, RB, North Carolina

Logan is a smaller back who can also be used as a receiver out of the backfield, and dropped just one of 69 catchable targets over the last three years. Logan had the fastest 40 time among running backs at the combine this year and has the potential to break off big plays, but it hasn’t always translated into production on offense. 232-pound teammate Elijah Hood had both a greater number of 15-plus-yard runs, and a higher percentage of breakaway runs last year. Regardless, he should have an impact as a returner after four kick-return touchdowns in four years. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


3:40 p.m. ET, April 29

Miami Dolphins

Round 5, pick No. 178: Davon Godchaux, DI, LSU

The Dolphins like penetrating defensive tackles, making Godchaux a good fit. He’ll likely be limited to a nickel role early because of his struggles against double-teams, but Godchaux’s athleticism makes him an ideal candidate to collapse the pocket on third downs. The former Tiger ended last season with 32 QB pressures and 17 combined knockdowns. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


3:36 p.m. ET, April 29

San Francisco 49ers

Round 5, pick No. 177: Trent Taylor, WR, Louisiana Tech

Trent Taylor is the second Louisiana Tech receiver drafted this year, and he led the draft class in slot receptions (131) and yards (1,734). His 1,055 yards after the catch last season were most in the draft class. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


3:34 p.m. ET, April 29

Cincinnati Bengals

Round 5, pick No. 176: J.J. Dielman, C, Utah

Dielman is a versatile offensive linemen who played both right tackle and center at Utah, but suffered a season-ending foot injury in 2016. Dielman only allowed one sack, no QB hits, and three pressures on his 137 pass-blocking snaps last season, and finished the year with a pass-blocking efficiency mark of 97.6. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


3:33 p.m. ET, April 29

Green Bay Packers

Round 5, pick No. 175: DeAngelo Yancy, WR, Purdue

DeAngelo Yancey was the top aerial threat for Purdue last season, as 75.5 percent of his receptions went for first downs. He was also a dangerous deep threat, as he caught 10 deep balls for 449 yards and six touchdowns. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


3:30 p.m ET, April 29

Atlanta Falcons

Round 5, pick No. 174: Eric Saubert, TE, Drake

Eric Saubert is a “move” tight end who may struggle to block at the next level, but scored 10 touchdowns last season at Drake. In the East-West Shrine game, he dropped two passes and had a touchdown reception called back because he jumped the snap early. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


3:28 p.m. ET, April 29

Pittsburgh Steelers

Round 5, pick No. 173: Brian Allen, CB, Utah

Allen adds depth in the Steelers’ secondary. He had four interceptions and three pass deflections last season, allowing a QB rating of only 86.0. While five touchdowns surrendered are a concern, Allen’s active style obviously appealed to Pittsburgh. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


3:26 p.m. ET, April 29

Denver Broncos

Round 5, pick No. 172: Isaiah McKenzie, WR, Georgia

Quarterbacks recorded a 128.6 passer rating when targeting Isaiah McKenzie in 2016, which was the second-highest mark in the SEC. McKenzie is at his best in the slot, where he played 91.3 percent of his snaps last season. He averaged 2.92 yards per route run from the slot, which ranks as sixth-best in the class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


3:16 p.m. ET, April 29

Buffalo Bills

Round 5, pick No. 171: Nathan Peterman, QB, Pittsburgh

We were surprised to see Nathan Peterman last this long in the draft, as he was our No. 5 prospect at the quarterback position. He made huge strides in 2016, in particular by boosting his completion percentage on play-action passes by 9.8 percent over 2015. On passes he threw in 2.5 seconds or less, he connected for 18 touchdowns to just three interceptions and had a QB rating of 124.6. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh

PFF QB Analyst Zac Robinson on Peterman:

Peterman is a very solid, steady player. He’s not an overly-smooth thrower, and lacks some zip, but he has a great understanding of the passing game and where to go with the ball. Peterman is very in control with his footwork/balance, allowing him to throw accurately. He sees the field clearly, consistently getting through progressions, eliminating a read a quickly and moving on to the next with relative ease. In addition, he manages and feels the pocket very well. He has experience working under center and can step in immediately as a backup and develop his game.


3:14 p.m. ET, April 29

Minnesota Vikings

Round 5, pick No. 170: Rodney Adams, WR, USF

Adams is an explosive receiver who is at his best when in the slot and can get into space. He ran over 80 percent of his routes from the slot in 2016. His 9.8 yards after the catch average was the second-highest mark among all FBS wide receivers with at least 50 receptions. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


3:10 p.m. ET, April 29

Houston Texans

Round 5, pick No. 169: Treston DeCoud, CB, Oregon State

Treston DeCoud is a long corner who is at his best in press coverage. DeCoud was on the field for 903 snaps last year, and was limited slightly by an injury midseason, but was quietly one of the premier cornerbacks in the Pac-12, breaking up nine passes. DeCoud allowed just 49.4 percent of passes thrown into his coverage to be completed in 2016. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


3:08 p.m. ET, April 29

Oakland Raiders

Round 5, pick No. 168: Marquel Lee, LB, Wake Forest

The Demon Deacons’ defense was underrated last season, and Marquel Lee was a major part of their stop unit. Oakland has added a late-round linebacker capable of shedding blocks, illustrated by his ACC-leading 63 defensive stops. While he is at his best attacking the line of scrimmage, Lee also allowed a QB rating of only 85.0 into his coverage. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


3:05 p.m. ET, April 29

New York Giants

Round 5, pick No. 167: Avery Moss, Edge, Youngstown State

Off-field issues sent Avery Moss from Nebraska to Youngstown State, but his game could translate very well to the NFL level. He has 341/2 inch arms, which he uses effectively to stack and shed blockers on run plays. He needs to develop his pass-rushing arsenal, but will have a great mentor in New York in Jason Pierre-Paul. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


3:03 p.m. ET, April 29

Philadelphia Eagles

Round 5, pick No. 166: Shelton Gibson, WR, West Virginia

Gibson is a deep threat wide receiver who caught all 17 catchable deep passes (20 or more yards downfield) thrown his way in 2016, turning them into 726 yards and eight TDs. Quarterbacks throwing to Shelton Gibson in 2016 had a 135.2 passer rating, which ranks seventh-best in the draft class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


3:02 p.m. ET, April 29

Detroit Lions

Round 5, pick No. 165: Jamal Agnew, CB, San Diego

The Lions recently brought Jamal Agnew into Detroit for a visit, thus his selection here isn’t a great surprise. His physicality will give him a chance to compete for playing time on nickel and dime downs, and his speed, vision, and cutting ability make him a dangerous return threat. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


2:59 p.m. ET, April 29

Miami Dolphins

Round 5, pick No. 164: Isaac Asiata, G, Utah

Utah offensive linemen are highly coveted in the NFL. Asiata is a powerful run-blocking guard who can hold up well in pass protection. He earned a positive grade on more than 30 percent of his pull blocks in 2016, and likes to move people at the line of scrimmage. Asiata did not allow a single pressure to a bull rush in 2016. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


2:55 p.m. ET, April 29

Buffalo Bills

Round 5, pick No. 163: Matt Milano, LB, Boston College

Matt Milano is an undersized linebacker at 6-foot-01/2 and 223 pounds, but he is a solid athlete. His 84.4 overall grade ranked 13th in the draft class among linebackers. In the past two seasons for the Eagles, he accumulated 12 sacks and 69 total defensive stops. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


2:53 p.m. ET, April 29

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Round 5, pick No. 162: Jeremy McNichols, RB, Boise State

McNichols is a versatile player out of the backfield who may end up being a jack-of-all-trades, master-of-none. He is coming off his best year as a runner with 62 broken tackles and 3.6 yards after contact, despite running behind a Boise State offensive line that was not nearly as good has it was in 2015. He may make his biggest mark as a receiver in Tampa Bay’s offense, where his 1.88 yards per route run ranked eighth in a running back class that has some very good receivers out of the backfield. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


2:52 p.m. ET, April 29

Indianapolis Colts

Round 5, pick No. 161: Anthony Walker, LB, Northwestern

Walker has the size and athleticism to play inside linebacker in the Colts’ defensive scheme. He’s at his best when being able to attack the line of scrimmage, as his 1.51 yards allowed per tackle was the best mark in the draft class. When asked to move backwards into coverage, he’s had struggles locating the ball and receivers in his zone, an area he will need to improve. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


2:47 p.m. ET, April 29

Cleveland Browns

Round 5, pick No. 160: Roderick Johnson, OT, Florida State

Johnson was highly inconsistent as the Seminoles’ starting left tackle, but he wowed at times with his length and athleticism. He was exceptional at times cutting off backside tackles on outside zone, showing rare movement skills both at the line of scrimmage and the second level. Johnson must refine his technique — he has a horrible tendency to raise his base — but when he gets his feet moving, he proves difficult to shed. Johnson’s pass-blocking efficiency of 93.6 on outside moves was 16th-best in the class, and he allowed only 16 combined QB pressures last season. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


2:45 p.m. ET, April 29

Baltimore Ravens

Round 5, pick No. 159: Jermaine Eluemunor, OT, Texas A&M

Jermaine Eluemunor played tackle at Texas A&M, but likely translates better at guard for Baltimore. His 92.7 pass-blocking efficiency rating on throws after after 2.6 seconds was ninth-best in the draft class. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


2:40 p.m. ET, April 29

Indianapolis Colts

Round 5, pick No. 158: Nate Hairston, CB, Temple

Hairston only allowed 23 receptions in 2016 and quickly brings down wide receivers who do get a catch on him. Hairston allowed an average of just 2.1 yards after the catch, which ties him at No. 2 in the draft class. Hairston allowed just 0.63 yards per cover snap in 2016, which ties him at No. 8 in the class in that regard. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


2:38 p.m. ET, April 29

Arizona Cardinals

Round 5, pick No. 157: Will Holden, OT, Vanderbilt

Holden struggled at times in pass protection last season, but flashed a nasty attitude in the run game. He registered a 79.6 run-blocking grade in 2016, making positive contributions on 92.4 percent of ground-game snaps (31st in the class). — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


2:36 p.m. ET, April 29

Atlanta Falcons

Round 5, pick No. 156: Brian Hill, RB, Wyoming

Hill is a big, physical runner that can be tough to bring down. He has shown the ability to break off big runs when he can get into the second level, as his 30 breakaway runs (15-plus yards) were second-most in the draft class. Hill’s bigger size should be a good compliment to Devonta Freeman and Tevin Coleman as a short-yardage back. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


2:34 p.m. ET, April 29

Tennessee Titans

Round 5, pick No. 155: Jayon Brown, Jayon Brown, LB, UCLA

Brown fits the direction the league is trending with its linebackers, as he has excellent range in coverage. Jayon Brown can cover tight ends easily and broke up six passes in 2016. Brown was also highly productive as a run defender, and his run-stop percentage of 11.8 ranks 15th in the draft class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


2:33 p.m. ET, April 29

Washington Redskins

Round 5, pick No. 154: Jeremy Sprinkle, TE, Arkansas

Jeremy Sprinkle offers versatility as both a blocker and passer, as he did not allow a single QB pressure in 2015 when asked to pass-block 42 times. From 2014–2016, he snagged 67 of 72 catchable balls. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


2:30 p.m. ET, April 29

Cincinnati Bengals

Round 5, pick No. 153: Jake Elliott, K, Memphis

Jake Elliott made 22 out of his 27 field goal attempts in 2016. He was two of three on his field goal attempts of 50-plus yards last year. Elliott excels at kickoffs, were 64 of his 97 attempts were touchbacks. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


2:28 p.m. ET, April 29

Carolina Panthers

Round 5, pick No. 152: Corn Elder, CB, Miami (FL)

The Panthers suffered without Josh Norman a season ago, but they may have found a capable replacement all the way down in the fifth round. Elder is an excellent fit in Carolina’s zone scheme, where he can use his physicality to challenge receivers at the line of scrimmage and negate some issues locating the football with his back to the quarterback. In three seasons at Miami, Elder never allowed a QB rating of more than 80.0, picking off three passes with 13 pass deflections. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


2:26 p.m. ET, April 29

Los Angeles Chargers logo header

Round 5, pick No. 151: Desmond King, CB/S, Iowa

Desmond King fell a lot further than the second-round grade he had on him, possibly due to his long-speed causing some to think he will be better at safety than cornerback. He has the ability to play either spot if in a zone scheme, but it looks like the Chargers may use him primarily at safety. Over the past three seasons, King has been one of the best at making plays on the ball with 14 interceptions and 24 pass breakups. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


2:23 p.m. ET, April 29

New York Jets

Round 5, pick No. 150: Jordan Leggett, TE, Clemson

Leggett is the type of tight end that can be moved around and aligned at different places. Leggett racked up 421 receiving yards in the slot last year, which ranks second among tight ends in the class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


2:20 p.m. ET, April 29

Atlanta Falcons

Round 5, pick No. 149: Damontae Kazee, CB, San Diego State

Kazee was a big-time playmaker for San Diego State, picking off seven passes in 2016 with four further pass deflections. Although he also allowed three touchdowns, Kazee’s completion percentage allowed of 50.0 was respectable. He adds depth to the Falcons’ secondary. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


2:17 p.m. ET, April 29

Jacksonville Jaguars

Round 5, pick No. 148 overall: Blair Brown, LB, Ohio

Blair Brown was one of the best run-defenders in the country last season, and is likely to out-produce most of the backers taken the round prior. Brown’s 92.6 overall grade was second-best among FBS linebackers last season, and he also had the highest tackle efficiency rating in college football. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


2:14 p.m. ET, April 29

Chicago Bears

Round 5, pick No. 147 overall: Jordan Morgan, G, Kutztown

Morgan is a small-school player who received a Senior Bowl invite and played well in Mobile. Morgan didn’t allow a sack, only one QB hit, and one hurry on his 22 pass-blocking snaps in the Senior Bowl, showing he can compete at the highest levels. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


2:11 p.m. ET, April 29

San Francisco 49ers

Round 5, pick No. 146 overall: George Kittle, TE, Iowa

George Kittle was a surprise faller today, as we love his blocking from college and his athletic ability as a receiver. Kittle had injury issues in 2016, but his 82.3 overall grade in 2015 was seventh-best among all FBS tight ends. He also posted the second-best run-blocking grade among draft-eligible tight ends in 2016. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


2:08 p.m. ET, April 29

Denver Broncos

Round 5, pick No. 145 overall: Jake Butt, TE, Michigan

Although he failed to post top numbers in any season, Jake Butt’s stats suffered from Michigan’s run-first offense. Despite registering only 546 yards in 2016, he ranked eighth in the class with 1.99 yards per route run. Butt does need to develop in the red zone (nine career TDs) and improve his hands (five drops from 51 catchable), but he represents a reliable mid-round option, assuming he recovers from a postseason ACL injury. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


2:01 p.m. ET, April 29

Indianapolis Colts

Round 4, pick No. 144 overall: Grover Stewart, DI, Albany State

Stewart looked like a monster on tape. He moves really well for his massive size (6-foot-4, 347 pounds) and can cause havoc at multiple positions along the defensive line. Stewart is strong enough to bull-rush a blocker and athletic enough to get around them, which is impressive at 347 pounds. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


1:58 p.m. ET, April 29

Indianapolis Colts

Round 4, pick No. 143 overall: Marlon Mack, RB, South Florida

Marlon Mack is one of the best athletes out of the running back class, and it frequently shows up on tape. He gained 52 percent of his rushing yards on his 15 breakaway runs (15-plus yards), the fourth-highest breakaway percentage in the class. However, he also relies on his athleticism too much at times, trying to bounce runs and run East-West far too often instead of just taking what he can. If he can figure out the balance between the two, he may be a steal this late. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


1:54 p.m. ET, April 29

Houston Texans

Round 4, pick No. 142 overall: Carlos Watkins, Edge, Clemson

Depth on the defensive line next to J.J. Watt has been a problem for Houston for some years. Watkins has the length to fit at 5-technique, and the power to collapse the pocket as a pass-rusher. Highlighting his complete skill-set, Watkins registered grades of 84.8 overall, 84.8 rushing the passer, and 81.4 against the run in his final season at Clemson. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


1:51 p.m. ET, April 29

New York Jets

Round 4, pick No. 141 overall: Chad Hansen, WR, California

The Jets get great value with the selection of Chad Hansen here, as he was our No. 9 wide receiver prospect in this draft class. His 16 deep-pass receptions were sixth-most in the class, and he is just as capable of taking a slant pass to the house with his open-field running ability. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


1:50 p.m. ET, April 29

New York Giants

Round 4, pick No. 140 overall: Wayne Gallman, RB, Clemson

After selecting Paul Perkins to represent a matchup problem in the mid-rounds last year, the Giants come back to pick their base-package runner. Gallman is more of a grinder than a big-play threat, but he’s almost impossible to stop once he finds a rhythm. He’s inconsistent week-to-week, but runs with violence when on his game, averaging 3 yards after contact per attempt and a missed tackle once in every 4.13 touches (16th in class) in 2016. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


1:46 p.m. ET, April 29

Kansas City Chiefs

Round 4, pick No. 139 overall: Jehu Chesson, WR, Michigan

The Chiefs grab a wide receiver to pair with their future starting quarterback, Patrick Mahomes. Chesson is a big target at 6-foot-3 and 204 pounds, and can use his frame to shield defensive backs away from the ball. Chesson’s deep passing (20 or more yards downfield) catch percentage of 46.7 ranks 19th in the draft class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


1:44 p.m. ET, April 29

Cincinnati Bengals

Round 4, pick No. 138 overall: Ryan Glasgow, DI, Michigan

The Bengals continue their dream draft by selecting underrated Michigan defensive tackle Ryan Glasgow. He posted 37 QB pressures on just 244 pass rushes last season for the Wolverines, giving him the fourth-best pass-rushing productivity rating among Big Ten defensive tackles. He’ll give the Bengals a much-needed interior pass-rushing presence next to long-time stud Geno Atkins. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


1:41 pm. ET, April 29

Indianapolis Colts

Round 4, pick No. 137 overall: Zach Banner, OT, USC

Banner endured some tough games in 2016, particularly in his Week 1 matchup against Alabama, but those handful of contests aside, he ranked amongst the best tackles in the class in pass protection. In total, he allowed only 11 QB pressures in the entirety of 2016, ranking ninth in the class in pass-blocking efficiency. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


1:37 p.m. ET, April 29

Atlanta Falcons

Round 4, pick No. 136 overall: Sean Harlow, T, Oregon State

Sean Harlow played tackle at Oregon State, but might also be able to play guard for the Falcons. Harlow is a physical run blocker and his 96.8 percent run-block success rate ranked No. 1 among tackles in the draft class. Harlow only allowed one sack, six QB hits ,and 12 hurries on 288 pass-blocking snaps in 2016. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


1:33 p.m. ET, April 29

Pittsburgh Steelers

Round 4, pick No. 135 overall: Joshua Dobbs, QB, Tennessee

Joshua Dobbs struggled with his consistency at times, but he performed well under pressure last season. He posted an adjusted completion percentage of 66.7 when the rush affected him last year, which was tied for fourth-best in the draft class. He also completed 55.8 percent of deep passes, the third-highest mark in the class. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh

PFF QB Analyst Zac Robinson on Dobbs:

Dobbs is an athletic player within and outside the pocket whose arm keeps progressing. He shows good overall pocket poise and will hang in to make tough throws in the face of pressure. The common theme with Dobbs is that he’s always been able to bounce back from bad plays throughout the course of a game to give his team a chance to win in the end. His work ethic and intelligence give him a chance to develop into a very solid backup QB, and is a good match for the Steelers.


1:31 p.m. ET, April 29

Green Bay Packers

Round 4, pick No. 134 overall: Jamaal Williams, RB, BYU

Williams doesn’t stand out athletically, but is a prime example of a running back whose strengths don’t show up on timed tests and combine drills against air. Williams is a physical runner who shows great balance through contact, and has experience in a zone-heavy run scheme. He broke 55 tackles last season, eighth-most in the draft class. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


1:27 p.m. ET, April 29

Dallas Cowboys

Round 4, pick No. 133 overall: Ryan Switzer, WR, North Carolina

Switzer might have to wait behind Cole Beasley because of his suitability in the slot (fourth in receptions, sixth in yards from the position in the class), but there is every chance he elevates the Cowboys’ receiving corps in the future. He understands the subtleties of route running and has the suddenness to create short-area separation, catching 77 percent of targets in 2016 for 1,114 yards. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


1:25 p.m. ET, April 29

Philadelphia Eagles

Round 4, pick No. 132 overall: Donnel Pumphrey, RB, San Diego State

The Eagles find their Sproles replacement, trading up in the fourth round to select Donnel Pumphrey. Size was held against the 5-foot-7 Sproles, and the same criticisms have been made of Pumphrey (5-foot-8), but his production was off the charts. Over three years, Pumphrey averaged 6.1 yards per carry (3.0 after contact), amassed 208 broken tackles, and scored 54 touchdowns. He is the dynamic back Doug Pederson has been searching for. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


1:22 p.m. ET, April 29

New England Patriots

Round 4, pick No. 131 overall: Deatrich Wise Jr., Edge, Arkansas

Deatrich Wise isn’t a top athlete, but still cracked our top 100 prospects due to his play against the run. He ranked second among draft-eligible SEC 4-3 defensive ends in run-stop percentage, and his 82.4 run-defense grade ranked fifth among SEC edge defenders. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


1:19 p.m. ET, April 29

Houston Texans

Round 4, pick No. 130 overall: Julie’n Davenport, OL, Bucknell

The Texans take the small-school tackle who made a Senior Bowl appearance. Davenport has a large frame, but will need some development to fulfill his potential in Houston. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


1:15 p.m. ET, April 29

Oakland Raiders

Round 4, pick No. 129 overall: David Sharpe, OT, Florida

The Raiders take a huge offensive tackle in David Sharpe, who is 6-foot-6 with 35.38-inch arms, so his size and length were hard for Oakland to ignore in the fourth round. The Raiders hope to develop Sharpe into a future protector for QB Derek Carr. Sharpe’s pass-blocking efficiency rating of 97.2 ranks 25th among offensive tackles in the draft class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


1:11 p.m. ET, April 29

Cincinnati Bengals

Round 4, pick No. 128 overall: Josh Malone, WR, Tennessee

The Bengals continue to replenish their receiving corps by adding receiver Josh Malone. He is both reliable (nine drops over 114 catchable passes in the last three seasons) and consistent (144.4 passer rating when targeted, fourth in the class). — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


1:08 p.m. ET, April 29

Detroit Lions

Round 4, pick No. 127 overall: Michael Roberts, TE, Toledo

Michael Roberts was a reliable receiving option over the middle for the Rockets last season, as he doubled-up the rest of the country’s tight ends with 16 touchdown receptions and just three dropped passes. He earned the highest PFF overall grade among tight ends in the FBS last season, with an 85.9 mark. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


1:05 p.m. ET, April 29

Cleveland Browns

Round 4, pick No. 126 overall: Howard Wilson, CB, Houston

In a draft where they have made plenty of splashes, the Browns move up to grab the Houston cornerback. Wilson allowed an average of just 2.6 yards after the catch lasts season, tied for seventh-best in this draft class. — Gordon McGuinness, @PFF_Gordon


1:04 p.m. ET, April 29

Los Angeles Rams

Round 4, pick No. 125 overall: Samson Ebukam, Edge, Eastern Washington

Samson Ebukam is an athletic edge rusher with a wide array of pass-rush moves who stood out to our analysts on film. Ebukam’s pass-rushing productivity rating of 13.2 ranks 13th in the draft class among 3-4 OLBs. Ebukam is also sound against the run, as his 25 run stops rank fourth-most among 3-4 OLBs in the class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


1:03 p.m. ET, April 29

Detroit Lions

Round 4, pick No. 124 overall: Jalen Reeves-Maybin, LB, Tennessee

Jalen Reeves-Maybin is another athletic linebacker for the Lions, but missed much of 2016 due to injury. Despite this, he still made a whopping 107 combined defensive stops between 2014 and 2016. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


1:00 p.m. ET, April 29

Washington Redskins

Round 4, pick No. 123 overall: Montae Nicholson, S, Michigan State

Nicholson did not make many plays on the ball last season for the Spartans, but he was able to consistently minimize damage. He gave up just one reception longer than 16 yards in 2016, and an average of just 1.9 yards after the catch. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


12:58 p.m. ET, April 29

Baltimore Ravens

Round 4, pick No. 122 overall: Nico Siragusa, G, San Diego State

Nico Siragusa had a dominant year in both phases of guard play in 2016. Siragusa’s 99.2 pass-blocking efficiency rating ranked No. 2 among guards in the draft class, and his run-block success rate of 93.4 percent also ranked No. 2 among guards in the class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


12:52 pm. ET, April 29

San Francisco 49ers

Round 4, pick No. 121 overall: Joe Williams, RB, Utah

Williams has excellent speed and is a threat to break off a big run anytime he can get out into the open field. He had 22 runs of 15-plus yards in 2016, tied for 10th-most in the draft class, but may struggle to create yardage on his own at the first level without good blocking. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


12:50 p.m. ET, April 29

Minnesota Vikings

Round 4, pick No. 120 overall: Ben Gedeon, LB, Michigan

Ben Gedeon is an instinctive run defender, but is unlikely to offer significant support on pass plays due to playing-speed deficiencies. He gave up just 1.98 yards per tackle, the seventh-best mark in the class. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


12:47 p.m. ET, April 29

Chicago Bears

Round 4, pick No. 119 overall: Tarik Cohen, RB, North Carolina A&T

At 5-foot-6 and 179 pounds, Cohen will be one of the smallest running backs in the league. He only played two games against FBS opponents in 2016, but forced five missed tackles on 29 carries. He possesses great acceleration and speed that should help in the return game, as well. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


12:44 p.m. ET, April 29

Philadelphia Eagles

Round 4, pick No. 118 overall: Mack Hollins, WR, North Carolina

The Eagles have selected the speedy Mack Hollins from North Carolina. He also has excellent size, and improved from six drops in 2015 to just one last season. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


12:40 p.m. ET, April 29

Los Angeles Rams

Round 4, pick No. 117 overall: Josh Reynolds, WR, Texas A&M

The Rams have used this draft to add weapons for last year’s No. 1 overall draft pick, QB Jared Goff, with Josh Reynolds their most recent selection. Reynolds averaged 6.1 yards after the catch over the past three seasons, and in 2016, 77.0 percent of his receptions resulted in first downs or touchdowns, ranking 21st among wide receivers in this draft class. — Gordon McGuinness, @PFF_Gordon


12:38 p.m. ET, April 29

Cincinnati Bengals

Round 4, pick No. 116 overall: Carl Lawson, Edge, Auburn

Medical and arm length questions dropped Lawson, but his game film is suggestive of a first-day talent. He totaled a ridiculous 67 combined QB pressures in 2016, including 22 knockdowns, concluding the year with a 90.9 PFF pass-rush grade. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


12:36 p.m. ET, April 29

Arizona Cardinals

Round 4, pick No. 115 overall: Dorian Johnson, G, Pittsburgh

The Cardinals badly needed help inside at guard, and Johnson is a good pick here for Arizona. Johnson’s 93.2 percent run-block efficiency success rate ranks third in the draft class. Johnson is also a sound pass protector and only allowed two sacks over the last three seasons at Pitt. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


12:32 p.m. ET, April 29

Washington Redskins

Round 4, pick No. 114 overall: Samaje Perine, RB, Oklahoma

Perine saw his playing time decrease the past two years with Joe Mixon’s emergence, but he’s a physical, downhill runner who will fit well in Washington’s blocking scheme. He averaged 3.5 yards after contact and forced 157 missed tackles over the past three seasons. — Matt Claassen, @PFF_Matt


12:30 p.m. ET, April 29

Los Angeles Chargers logo header

Round 4, pick No. 113 overall: Rayshawn Jenkins, S, Miami

Physically, Jenkins possesses all the traits of an NFL safety. However, he struggles at times playing under control, as well as taking the correct angle to the ball. Despite those limitations, Jenkins allowed a QB rating of only 75.4 on 80 targets into his primary coverage. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


12:27 p.m. ET, April 29

Chicago Bears

Round 4, pick No. 112 overall: Eddie Jackson, S, Alabama

The Bears were expected to draft a free safety this weekend, and they get a great value in Round 4 with Eddie Jackson. When healthy in 2015, opposing quarterbacks completed just 22 of 43 throws into his coverage, as he racked up six interceptions and broke up two other passes. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


12:21 p.m. ET, April 29

Seattle Seahawks

Round 4, pick No. 111 overall: Tedric Thompson, S, Colorado

Tedric Thompson is a versatile back-end defender capable of pressing the slot, as well as playing the deep-third in Seattle’s cover-3 scheme. He posted the highest coverage grade in the nation last year among FBS safeties, as he picked off seven passes and broke up another seven. — Josh Liskiewitz, @PFF_Josh


12:18 pm. ET, April 29

Jacksonville Jaguars

Round 4, pick No. 110 overall: Dede Westbrook, WR, Oklahoma

Dede Westbrook is a talented playmaking wide receiver who should make an impact quickly with Jacksonville. Westbrook’s 4.08 yards per route run in 2016 ranked second among wide receivers in the class. — Jordan Plocher, @PFF_Jordan


12:16 p.m. ET, April 29

Minnesota Vikings

Round 4, pick No. 109 overall: Jaleel Johnson, DI, Iowa

Johnson is a reliable interior run defender. With a diverse pass-rushing skill-set — illustrated by his pass-rushing productivity mark of 10.4 (eighth in the class) — Johnson represents a defensive tackle with starting potential. — John Breitenbach, @PFF_John


12:14 p.m. ET, April 29

Green Bay Packers

Round 4, pick No. 108 overall: Vince Biegel, LB, Wisconsin

Vince Biegel was an ultra-productive outside linebacker at Wisconsin. He has the ability to rush the passer at the NFL level off the edge or kick inside. His 15.3 pass-rushing productivity ranked 11th among edge rushers in this class, and he has more than enough athleticism to test the edge on NFL tackles. — Mike Renner, @PFF_Mike


11:54 a.m. ET, April 29

Top 50 remaining prospects for Day 3

With Day 2 of the 2017 NFL Draft in the books, the Pro Football Focus analysis team takes a look at the top remaining players on our draft board. Edge defender Carl Lawson and wide receiver Dede Westbrook are among the highest-ranked prospects headed for Rounds 4–7.

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