Midseason All-Pro Team

Assembling the best of 2014's first half, Khaled Elsayed offers the PFF Midseason All-Pro Team.

| 2 years ago
2014-mids-All-Pro

Midseason All-Pro Team


2014-mids-All-ProIt’s not about stats. It’s not about who has the best highlight reel. It’s about who, play to play, have been the best players.

That’s the ethos behind our Midseason All-Pro Team, wanting to give back to the players who have made the first nine weeks of the NFL season enjoyable. Whether you’re a first-year undrafted free agent or a veteran with 10 Pro Bowls on your CV, you’re measured the same.

So with that in mind let’s introduce our Midseason All-Pro Team.

OFFENSE

Quarterback:  Ben Roethlisberger (PIT)

Pulled away from the competition with his performances in the past two weeks, but this is Roethlisberger at his best. His playmaking has never been in doubt but he’s doing all the little things well and it’s adding up to a tremendous season.

Honorable Mention: Aaron Rodgers (GB) and Tom Brady (NE)

Running Back: DeMarco Murray (DAL)

His fumbles aren’t great and we’d like more in the passing game, but this is the running back spot and no-one has been anywhere near as effective as Murray in that regard. His +11.9 rushing grade dwarves that of Lynch (+6.5) in second spot.

Honorable Mention: Marshawn Lynch (SEA) and Le’Veon Bell (PIT)

Fullback: Anthony Sherman (KC)

Proving himself no one year wonder, Sherman is poised to repeat his breakthrough 2013 season where he earned an All Pro nod from our good selves.

Honorable Mention: Jerome Felton (MIN)

Tight End: Rob Gronkowski (NE)

Slowly worked his way back from injury before exploding these past three weeks in a fit of Gronktastic rage. There isn’t another tight end like him in the league and it’s great to see him healthy.

Honorable Mention: Jason Witten (DAL) and Martellus Bennett (CHI)

Wide Receivers: Antonio Brown (PIT) and T.Y. Hilton (IND)

It’s no surprise to see Brown here. He might not be the physical specimen some look for but he’s been as good as any receiver in the league for a while now. Hilton is more of a surprise, elevating his game to a whole new level.

Honorable Mention: Jordy Nelson (GB), Demaryius Thomas (DEN) and Jeremy Maclin (PHI)

Tackles: Joe Thomas (CLE) and Ricky Wagner (BAL)

Five years after Joe Thomas retires someone better start preparing their induction speech for him, because he’s Hall of Fame bound. His performance has never slipped and this year is no different with him owning the best pass blocking and run blocking grade of any tackle. Wagner is the surprise and was really the only right tackle we considered. His +13.7 grade has him streaks ahead of Marcus Gilbert (+6.2) in second.

Honorable Mention: Jason Peters (PHI), Branden Albert (MIA) and Andrew Whitworth (CIN)

Guards: Josh Sitton (GB) and Marshal Yanda (BAL)

Two of the most respected guards in the league sit one and two in our guard rankings on the year. Yanda has had some difficulties (by his standards) in pass protections but his run blocking has been a delight to watch. Sitton can’t claim to have that kind of impact in the run game, but he’s near unbeatable when Aaron Rodgers drops back from center.

Honorable Mention: Kelechi Osemele (BAL), Zack Martin (DAL) and Joel Bitonio (CLE)

Center: Nick Mangold (NYJ)

Whether it injury or being replaced by the incumbent starter, Mangold has seen all challengers drop out of the race leaving him a very obvious pick at center. He is back to his best after a shaky 2013.

 

Click to Page 2 for the defensive All-Pros…

  • Dohkay

    Golden Tate? Take him away from Detroit and there is zero chance they are 6-2 right now and especially not 3-0 in games without Calvin Johnson.

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    • Mike

      These are more grade based rather than impact based. Still though, hard to argue that he’s had a better season than Brown and TY

      • Terry Welsh

        Not really, the Lions are 0-8 without him.

        • Matt

          LOL, no they’re not.

        • Not True

          That’s a little drastic.

        • Josh Knepshield

          Antonio Brown is the absolute best. Hilton is playing lights out. Tate is good, but not quite on that level yet.

    • Mike

      sorry, hard to agree that he deserved the spot over AB and TY

      • Dohkay

        I’m not lobbying for the top spot but I think he certainly deserves an honorable mention.

        In terms of yards, he has 36.1% of Detroit’s receiving yards, just ahead of Brown at 36% and the others 30-34%. He’s also a beast for yards after the catch. His 7.1 YAC AVG trails only Thomas at 7.7. The others range from 4.4 – 6.1.

        I get that this is grade-based and he is awful in run-blocking (something even I have noticed while watching games) which drags his grade down further but it’s hard to ignore overall value to the team.

        • LightsOut85

          If we’re talking grades, he’s still only 11th sorting by receiving grade.

          (Though, in the vein of your comment, I agree in disagreement with PFF’s sometimes-practice of picking their “teams” by over-all grade, which weights aspects of play equally, when in reality that’s not true of every position. ex: last year, Bowman getting on the all-pro weighted almost entirely by his pass-rush grade (something he spent only a tiny fraction of his snaps doing)).

      • Terry Welsh

        I don’t, Tate is really a great addition to Detroit’s WR core. He rarely drops passes and the biggest thing is he is ALWAYS OPEN. Now that Calvin is back they will be a deadly duo.

    • Jason

      Zero chance, their defense has been the best in the league…

      • Dohkay

        Last time I checked you still have to score points to win a game.

        • Jason

          Are you claiming that Detroit would be unable to score without Tate?

          • Dohkay

            Without Calvin? Absolutely. Last season they scored 2 TDs in the 2 games he missed. This year they’ve managed 7 in 3 games and Tate has accounted for a ton of their yards along with 2 of the TDs.

    • corners

      its their defenses keeping them in the games, not the offense. They can barley sneeze 20 points out of a game.

      • Dohkay

        Not disagreeing that the defense has been better than the offense. My point is that Tate is the reason they’re scoring on offense. In the 5 games Calvin was either limited/out Tate has accounted for 3 of their 8 passing TDs and 599 of their 1,241 passing yards. He’s the reason they’ve managed to score enough points to win.

        Credit to the defense for keeping the games in reach but they did that last year and the Lions couldn’t win without Calvin (gave up 22 in GB and 14 in MN but the Lions offense managed 9 and 13 points in those losses).

  • Pygskyn

    Just a little oops in there, Brandon Flowers doesn’t play for Miami. (We’ll gladly take him though) LOL

    • mpepin

      Perhaps they meant Brent Grimes, whose play has made him worthy of this list.

      • Pygskyn

        It would be nice, but Grimes had a bit of a rough start to the season. He has been playing like an all-pro monster this past month+ and if he keeps it up, he should be on the team at the end of the season.

        • Dohkay

          Let’s see how he fares this week… Megatron is looming.

          • Chris

            Megatron Shmegatron

          • Pygskyn

            Yeah, it should be one heck of a matchup. Megatron will get his (I mean, he’s Megatron after all)) but I expect Grimes to keep him from getting insane out there, especially if Jones spends a good part of the day rolled to his side. If those two pro-bowlers playing their best ball can’t keep Johnson from going off, nobody can.

      • Chris

        Jones been great since his return, but other than that the strength of the Dolphins has been their front 7. 2 great ends and 3 good interior lineman. Jenkins and Trusnik have both been pleasant surprises, as has Wheeler’s improved play.

        • corners

          Lets not forget Fields has finally found his form. This guy sin gle handedly kept us in many games the last few years.

          Our defense + Fields is a weapon thats good at pinning teams inside the 10. Im telling you, Punters are very important now a days because of field position.They are just so good at directional punting now.

          • Chris

            I’ll agree with that. A good punter is very underrated. I loved the articles they ran by Kluwe on here – it really shows the disparity in what the public thinks a good punter is and what a good punter actually is.

  • AJ

    How has Linsley rated compared to Mangold? I thought I read earlier this week that he has graded as the 3rd best C by you guys. And since he’s playing C with Rodgers and they have a much better record and team I figured a rookie playing at the level might get some love. Just wondering

    • Chris

      Currently 4th.

      • AJ

        So if he keeps this up all yr think he’d get the nod since he’s a rookie and came in with no experience with Rodgers and would grade out as one of the best?

        • Chris

          Mangold’s grade is more than twice what Linsley’s is. They’re both good run blockers but Mangold distances himself as a pass blocker.

          Mangold’s only real competition was Mack, who would’ve been in 2nd place right behind him but his injury puts him out of the race.

  • YeaaBudda

    No Love for Everson Griffen. More tackles than both Von Miller and Cam Wake. Even in sacks with Miller and 2.5 more than Wake. Oh well, he will make the NFL all-pro roster at the end of the season, the one that actually matters.

    • enai D

      My thoughts exactly. Leaving Griffin off the list in favor of guys like Miller and Wake seems to be choosing style over substance- i.e. the guys with more recognizable names who aren’t having quite as good a season.

      • ChiTownPhil

        Griffen is just the viking’s version of AJ Hawk…
        “Stats!” vs the actual play of the player.

      • corners

        wake has been underrated hos whole career because hes played on a mediocre dolphins team most of his career. So please dont play “hes more popular” bs.

        Go watch some dolphins games. You have to game plan for Wake, he just changes things. He gets game changing sacks and fumbles. The guy opposite him had a pro bowl year last year and is on pace again because of wakes play.

        Stop being a baby.

      • enai D

        Lol. Wake is a name most informed football fans know well. Griffen is in his first year as a starter, many people have never heard of him. And there’s no reasonable argument that Wake’s having even close to as good a season as Griffen, he loses in every quantifiable measure. Clearly a case of the known player getting selected on name recognition alone- I know the truth hurts, sorry (stop being a baby).

    • Chris

      Stats only tell half the story. If a DE gets around his man and into the backfield in 2 seconds, but the ball is already gone, did he fail in his job?

      Some guys are more consistently causing havoc in the backfield and creating mismatches that opponents have to plan for, even though they don’t have the sack numbers to match it. That is the entire premise of this site.

      Griffen might have more sacks than Wake, which is all the public cares about, but Wake is +25.6 in pass rushing and Griffen is only +3.9. That means Wake is consistently having a bigger impact in the backfield and on the game.

      • Dust

        No Chris, 9 sacks is having a greater impact than 6.5. Just like having 10 Tds is greater than 7, pretty simple stuff. These advanced metrics go too far sometimes. I’m in favor of them and like the idea, but actual stats matter far more than “Sabermetrics”. Griffen is having a statistically superior season to Wake. The biggest issue is that where Wake has a so-called advantage over Miller is in an area that cannot be tangibly measured. He is receiving a point or two for each “pressure” or w/e the criteria is to gain the +25.6. Again, I will take tangible, measurable, real numbers over “Sabermetrics” any day of the week.

        • Chris

          9 sacks is greater than 6.5? In a vacuum sure. But what if Player A has 4 free rush sacks where he wasn’t blocked, and Player B faces double teams every play? Is 9 still better than 6.5?

          What if Player A is only winning 1/4 of his matchups, but thanks to a few more free rushes he has a higher sack number? But Player B is winning over 1/2 of his matchups, living in the backfield, but because teams gameplan for him they keep throwing quickly and he doesn’t convert as many into sacks?

          If you want to judge players simply on a box score go right ahead. I’ll continue to use grades that come from rating every single snap.

          • Jeff

            Well said Chris. The problem is that many fans only look at the fancy stats, and base their opinion on that. Just look at last season and JJ Watt’s complete dominance over the league. Since his sacks were down, that meant that another player with “fancy” stats like Luke Kuechly won DPOY. When the tape and this site clearly showed otherwise.

            Though hopefully football turns into baseball where its more than just the basic stats show a player’s true impact on the game.

          • Pygskyn

            And lets hope that thats the ONLY way that football gets more like baseball. 😉

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          • EVGriff

            Lets not play the “what if” game. What if Wake has all of his sacks because the QB fell over and Wake happened to be there. It can go both ways. Yes, advanced metrics/tracking works, but like I stated in my original post; Griffen is being snubbed on every list. I watch every Vikings game and can assure you he is very disruptive and should have more than 9 sacks. Point is, he will be an all-pro this year – awarded from the NFL, which holds much more validity than PFF. So while do agree with your scenarios Chris, they are in fact just Scenarios and do not apply/hold relevance to Griffen. Watch a game and you will see.

          • Chris

            I’ll take the word from the guys that watch every game, and not a Vikings fan wondering why a Vikings player didn’t make the list.

          • ChickenHunter

            Chris, as usual, doesn’t understand the game himself and only relies on his fanboy worship of these number crunchers. He doesn’t understand that there is bias, could be unintentional, when these people grade players. Everyone has biases. He treats these excel spreadsheet stats as if they were an exact science. Why do you think very few West Coast players are on these lists event hough there is a consensus that the deepest rosters in the league belong to the West Coast teams.

          • Chris

            I’m not fanboy worshipping. But if it comes down to a Vikings fan arguing that his Vikings player is better than he seems and deserves to be on the list vs. the guys who watch every single game and grade them all, I’ll take the guys grading every single game instead of the bitter Vikings fan.

            Not sure how you got on a tangent about spreadsheets and West Coast teams based on my comment.

          • ChiTownPhil

            Oh look – viking fans whining and behaving like babies…
            What a surprise.

        • Jason

          False, he is having a statistically superior season in 2 categories, sacks and tackles. Sacks yardage lost, passes defended, forced fumbles, hurries, QB hits, all belong to Wake.

      • nogoodnamesleft90210

        Aren’t PFF grades just another stat? And a rather inscrutable one at that. According to PFF stats for Sacks/Hits/Hurries, Wake is 7/9/22 and Griffen is 8/8/20. Pretty much dead even. Without knowing more about how PFF grades pass rush, I can only speculate as to why the grading is so far apart. I’m still waiting for an explanation of what constitutes a negative pass rush.

        • Geraldo

          Grades also factor in how quickly the pressure was generated and how many blockers the player had to get through. An unblocked sack looks the same in the box score as a guy getting through a double team. As does a player taking 4 seconds to beat one guy vs. a player taking 2 seconds to beat 2 guys. These are just a few of the things to consider when grading a player. And negative pass rush has a lot to do with snap counts (among other things). A player with 100 pass rushes without a single pressure will get a negative pass rush grade.

          • LightsOut85

            Also, negative just means “below average” (since 0.0 is average). I think that, at least for people who only know a little about PFF, is sometimes “misleading” (not the right word…but I think you get my drift). ex: A QB’s Y/A could be considered “good” , but be below an even-better league-average (since averages can be weighted by extremes).

            I think sometimes people see a negative grade (especially a < -1 red grade) & think it translates to "very poor" – when it just means "below average" (to w/e degree). They also don't think about the fact that most players fluctuate game-by-game & a guy who never gets above 0.9 could look "pretty average" (game-to-game) but end up with a good score for the season.

        • Chris

          It’s not a stat. It’s a grade. Sacks, hits, and hurries (total pressures) are stats created in an attempt to measure how well DL are playing. Consider the following three scenarios:

          Player A: DE takes 6 seconds to get around the OT before he finally gets to the QB for a sack.

          Player B: DE swim moves around the OT immediately, then beats the RB and gets to the QB for a sack.

          Player C: DE is unblocked and runs straight to the QB for a sack.

          All 3 of these go in the scorebook as the same thing – a sack. But if you had to grade all 3, do they all get the same grade? 1 had very easy difficulty, 1 took forever to do his job, and 1 straight up dominated.

          Surely they don’t deserve the same grade for those performances, yet the statsheet shows them all with the same result. PFF is watching the tape of every player to go beyond the statbook, which doesn’t always tell the whole story, and giving player A -0.1, Player B +2.0, and Player C +0.0 for the differing levels of talent and skill displayed on the play.

          So now if you look at season long stats you can see a guy (Wake) who has less sacks than another guy (Griffen), yet he has a much higher pass rushing grade because he is more consistently winning matchups and dominating plays.

          As I’ve said several times, if a DE beats his man and is at the QB in under 2 seconds, is it his fault the ball is already gone? Even though he dominated his matchup, because the QB threw a quick bubble screen he’ll get nothing on the statsheet to show for it.

          Not to say sack conversion rate (how often players convert pressures into sacks) isn’t important, but there are so many factors that you don’t get by just looking at sack stats. PFF watches the tape and accounts for all those factors.

          • nogoodnamesleft90210

            The grades you cite don’t make any sense to me without player adjustments and more situational context. If a guy takes 6 seconds to generate pressure, I still don’t see why that rates a negative grade. It’s like double penalizing them. He might as well have given up and dropped into coverage according to that grade. If player B just blew by an awful player (say, Michael Oher), why does that earn the same grade as if they blew by Jason Peters? Player C may have been unblocked but he still has to sack the quarterback. So no matter whether he sacks Russell Wilson, Ben Roethlistberger or Matt Cassell, he gets zero credit?

          • Chris

            All of those things are accounted for when they review the tape. That’s why grades are way better than any other stats.

          • LightsOut85

            AFAIK, the aspect of “adjusting for opponent” *isn’t* reflected in PFF grades. (I remember an old description of their grading (regarding treating players equally – not giving bias to stars like TV analysts do), “We don’t look at like all-pro Walter Jones, we look at it as LT #78 for SEA”). I think that’s something you have to apply “subjectively” (ie: “These 2 RE have similar pass-rush grades, but the LT guy#1 faced had considerably higher pass-pro grades, so I’ll “count” him as being the better pass-rusher).

            I could be wrong (that would be cool…though I’d be confused by a possible circular adjustment (“He played a good LT…but is that guy just good because he played bad DE? Or are they bad because he’s good?” lol), but AFAIK the only adjustments (after the grading itself, which as you said, takes into account the HOW) are the ones made so that the average scores become 0.0 .

            Big kudos for laying the smack-down on all the pseudo-trolls though 😀

          • Chris

            Yea I think if you try to factor in strength of open you’ll get I to that circular argument and then down the rabbit hole you go.

            If that’s true then there needs to be an easier way to see who these guys have matched up against.

          • LightsOut85

            I’ve always wondered how FO does it with their DYAR. Especially with team-OFF/DEF. Not only the (possible) circular-adjusting, but whether or not they retroactively adjust it (that is, if after 4 games a D looks terrible (so opposing offenses weren’t credited with much DYAR), but after 13 (or say games 5-13) they “prove” (larger sample) they’re elite — do the first 4 opponents get re-adjusted for those games?

            I should probably quit wondering all of this before my head explodes, haha.

    • Geraldo

      Tackles as a statistic are essentially useless. They tell you nothing about the quality of the play and other stuff like how many yards the defender allowed by getting pushed to the second level by his blocker before making the tackle. A lineman who gets pushed back a few yards and then makes a tackle after allowing a big gain gets the same credit in the box score as a guy who beats his block and stops a ball carrier for minimal yardage.

      • Chris

        Agree 100%.

      • Pygskyn

        The only players on the field that I would really consider Tackles a serious stat for are the Mike Backers. Gobbling up tackles is really their primary job (well, that and quarterbacking the defense), and even then it just gives you a ballpark, you have to still go deeper to truely get a full picture.

    • Jason

      This is a case of confirmation bias. You watch Griffen play, see his stats, and then go looking for people to share your opinion. When they don’t you blast them. I don’t understand why people who don’t agree with the methodology of PFF visit the site to quote stats.
      And I have never watched a Vikings game, but I’ve seen a lot of games with Wake, the guy is a BEAST. I wouldn’t make the assumption that Griffen is better until you watch some tape on the guy you think is worse, you might be surprised.

      • LightsOut85

        Brilliant, particularly the first paragraph. If people truly don’t like PFF (as a whole), they should stick to complaining somewhere that cares more about how loud your comments are, than whether they contain compelling evidence. (That’s if they’re not just trolls, of course).

        I think PFF trying to become more mainstream (having “news” articles, etc) is only going to attract more people like this, however.

  • Jason Williams

    Is this based on performance or reputation? Scratching my head on a couple of these.

    • Jason Williams

      Also doesn’t Forte have the most yards from scrimmage in the NFC? NFL? No love?

      • Chris

        Grades aren’t stat based.

    • enai D

      Reputation appears to be weighted disproportionately here.

  • Chris

    The new filters in the Premium section are wonderful btw.

    • PetEng

      Word.

    • LightsOut85

      Agreed. My hopes may be unrealistic…but in the same vein I’d LOVE for the same check-mark method for *years* (so you can add years together – save having to copy-paste, sort out non-matching, & adding in Excel). (Although I’d give that a lower priority than finally getting stats only shown in articles (like receiving by route-type, or pass-rushing by down) :D).

  • Anthony

    What about Tashaun Gipson? Dude has 6 interceptions already, and it’s not the end of the season. I would replace Weddle with Gipson.

    • Brian Bigger

      He is graded lower than both Weddle and Smith, primarily because of run defense (although both had higher pass coverage grades as well). However, he could be in honorable mention.

  • Matt Weinge

    I was under the impression that N. Suh was putting forth a stellar campaign, how it is that he doesn’t even warrant an honorable mention?

  • PetEng

    Why wasn’t Ian Williams, the top rated NT, not included on this list in any capacity?

    • Chris

      Probably because Harrison’s run defense is better, which is the primary purpose of a NT. Only reason I can think of.

      • PetEng

        The play distribution for most NTs in a 3-4 is around 50/50. Seems strange they should value run D that much.

        • Chris

          Play distribution for NTs might be 50/50, but most NFL games have a 30/45 distribution. So a 50/50 rate implies they’re used more on run downs.

          • PetEng

            Seems pretty clear that Ian Williams is significantly more successful on a per snap basis. Not providing value on 45% of snaps is a pretty big drag to overcome.

          • Chris

            Williams distribution of snaps isn’t 50/50. He’s played about an 11/9 ratio while his team in total has played about 19/32. So he’s playing more run snaps than pass snaps and his team is playing almost twice as many pass snaps as run snaps.

            The same goes for Harrison. He’s played about a 15/12 ratio while his team has played about 25/41, so again he’s played more run snaps than pass snaps while his team is nearing double pass snaps.

            Therefore the NT (Harrison) that is a better run stopper (by almost double the grade of Williams) should get the nod.

          • PetEng

            By almost double the grade? You arent adjusting for snap count.

            Regardless, it still doesnt get over the fact that one player is an active liability in the pass game, where they spend 45% of their snaps, and one is not.

          • Chris

            The team is spending 60% of their snaps against the pass, so 45% is less than it sounds like. And he’s not a total liability, he just isn’t as balanced. But yes, twice the grade. A low snap count doesn’t help someone, it just hurts them. Harrison has been the better run defender, which is the primary usage of a NT. Endo

          • PetEng

            He grades out as 76th of 82 qualifying defenders in pass rush. That’s bad.

            I’m not sure I understand your logic. If an NT had a 13 grade in pass rush, and a 0 grade in run defense they would be considered to have a stellar season. Snap distribution dictates the skillset needed. An NT is a specialist that needs to be equally skilled in defending the run as compared to the pass. An every down player needs to be more skilled at defending the pass – as dictated by snap distribution.

          • Chris

            That’s like saying your QB needs to be equally skilled at throwing and running – some things are more important for certain positions, and for NTs that’s run stopping.

          • PetEng

            Defense gets what the offense gives them. And the offenses give NT a 55/45 distribution of run/pass. Pass defense should be nearly equal weight in player grading. That’s represented in the PFF grading system…because he has a higher grading.

            If NT were seeing a 90/10 run/pass split then there would be no discussion.

          • Chris

            Offenses have a 55-60% pass ratio, but NTs aren’t on the field for the majority of those for a reason. They take them off on passing downs. Big 2 gap suffers aren’t pass rushers, there’s nothing else to say at that point.

          • LightsOut85

            Grades are already adjusted for snap-count (on a per-game basis, at least).

          • PetEng

            I thought it was a summation of the grades. They normalize the grades so the average play normalizes to 0 – which allows their nice distribution

          • LightsOut85

            One a per-game basis I’m *pretty* sure they are (although – their descriptions of “how they do what they do” are always pretty vague). ex: 2 players (same position). A plays 40 cover-snaps & B plays 20. Both have a 3.5 cover grade for the game. I *think* they add up the scores they gave them for each play, normalize it for snap-count, then make the “average = zero” adjustment. (The player with more snaps had more *chances* to get high single-play-grades, is how I’ve seen them word it before).

            That’s how *I’ve* read their descriptions, at least.

  • Mark

    Von Miller isn’t even the best LB taken in his draft class – that would be Justin Houston.

    • Chris

      Disagree.

    • Geraldo

      Mark, what is your evidence for this other than basic box score stats? (FYI, if you use traditional box score stats to argue your point, you’re essentially missing the whole point of PFF)

      • anon76returns

        Even basic box score stats have Miller better than Houston

    • Aaron McFarland

      are you drunk?

    • LightsOut85

      They play different roles & it would depend on what you’re asking them to do. I’d say it’s a “you can’t really go wrong” decision here.

  • Josh Knepshield

    Where in the world is Aaron Donald??????

    • Chris

      Not enough snaps yet is my guess. He played as a researve early in the season and players with higher volumes of snaps are going to be ahead of him by default. The same way guys who were dominating but got injured aren’t on the list.

  • http://maddendude.blogspot.com/ Baseman

    Mack gets an honorable mention yet he’s the 3rd highest rated linebacker by PFF. Okay.

    • Chris

      He does all his work against the run, but has struggled comparatively as a pass rusher.

      He’s listed in the edge rusher category which obviously favors premier edge rushers more than dominant run stoppers.

      • LightsOut85

        I’m glad they made that distinction. In the past they’ve (at times) gone just by total grade & not made “real life” distinction (favoring receiving for TE, pass-rushing for DE/OLB, etc).

  • Stelta

    Both OT’s attended Wisconsin. Of course, so did the best D-lineman.

  • ChickenHunter

    Ian Williams is constantly being mentioned as the Nose Tackle of The Week (Week 6, Week, 5, Week 3), mentioned as an Honorable Mention in Week 4, and named All Star NT of the 1st Quarter. He had a bye week on Week 8. So that means he’s the top performer in the league in half the games he’s played, yet he doesn’t even get an Honorable Mention on this All Star list?

    Lucy, ju have some splaining 2 du!

  • ChickenHunter

    Ian Williams is constantly being mentioned as the Nose Tackle of The Week (Week 6, Week, 5, Week 3), mentioned as an Honorable Mention in Week 4, and named All Star NT of the 1st Quarter. He had a bye week on Week 8. So that means he’s the top performer in the league in half the games he’s played, yet he doesn’t even get an Honorable Mention on this All Star list?

    Lucy, ju got sum splaining 2 du!

  • http://batman-news.com Chris S

    Justin Houston is leading the NFL in sacks, but he’s only an honorable mention? You do know he has defended less pass plays than Von Miller too, right? So not only is his number of sacks higher, but his sack efficiency is higher as well.

    But that’s just honorable mention.

    I’m disappointed in you, PFF.

    • Jason

      I know what you mean, Matt Asiata has 6 rushing TD in 84 attempts, how is he not the top running back on this list, Murray only has 1 more in 225 attempts.
      /sarcasm

      • corners

        3.3 yards per carry is beastly though!

  • sikologik

    you forgot TEBOW.

  • Bruce Walker

    Are you kidding me? Detroit has the number one yardage and scoring defense at the halfway point despite facing Green Bay, New Orleans, Atlanta. Deandre Levy needs to be there, sure, but Suh is not even honorably mentioned. Fairley? Quin? Slay?

  • LightsOut85

    Late & more of a “talking to myself” comment — and it’s probably something that one could only answer with speculation, but I wonder if there’s a “realistic cap” to grades in some cases. That is,

    ex: Offensive linemen. Often we see at least 1 guy who has 1 grade (usually run-block) get insanely high. Let’s say Evan Mathis – he usually has an insanely high run-blocking grade. (Using arbitrary numbers), say he gets a 2.0 grade on a run-play….did he really need to dominate that much for the play to work? Could someone else giving a performance that only gets a 1.5, or a 1.0 have contributed the same amount to the play? (& the entire play resulted in the same ….result).

    You could put this in the context of, “who would I want for LG on my team: Evan Mathis, or (someguy)? Someguy has a better pass-block grade…BUT EVAN MATHIS’S RUN GRADE IS 20 POINTS HIGHER! WOA!” Is there a point at which a grade (for some position, in some aspect of play) becomes “overkill”? That it may represent a more dominant performance in isolation (perhaps directly matched up against an opposing player), but doesn’t affect the outcome of the play any more (if every other person had performed the same)?

  • Lecrazy

    No Andrew Luck? Roethlisberger showed today that he’s not in the same class as Brady, Manning, or Luck. He had two good games.

  • Thomas Bell

    TY Hilton over Demarius Thomas? Shee–eeit.

  • Johnny Vicars

    So I wonder if their Ben being all Pro changed slightly after the jets loss…..Sorry 2 weeks does not make you a all pro