The (updated) 2016 PFF seven-round mock draft

PFF analysts projected all seven rounds of the 2016 NFL draft based on who they would pick. Here's how it played out.

| 8 months ago
(Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

(Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

The (updated) 2016 PFF seven-round mock draft


(Editor’s note: PFF went back and revised its seven-round mock draft following Wednesday’s news of the Eagles trading up with Cleveland for the No. 2 overall pick. What follows is the updated version with the correct pick order.)

In Pro Football Focus’ seven-round mock draft for 2016, a single analyst operated as the general manager for each of the 32 NFL teams.

With trades galore, take a look at who your team picked up, and how each pick shook out:

1. Los Angeles Rams: Jared Goff, QB, California

General manager: Jordan Plocher

The Rams traded all of those picks to get their QB of the future. While the debate will rage on for the next few weeks as to which quarterback should get taken with the first pick, we feel that it should be Goff. He sat near the top in our QB grades all year and finished as the top passer in the class when facing pressure.

2. Philadelphia Eagles: Carson Wentz, QB, North Dakota State

General manager: John Breitenbach

Wentz isn’t a great fit for the Eagles’ offense under new head coach Doug Pederson, but you don’t give up five picks to move into the top two to not take a quarterback here. Wentz earned a higher per-snap grade this season than Goff, and has the measureables and athletic ability to be a very good NFL quarterback.

3. San Diego Chargers: DeForest Buckner, DE, Oregon

General manager: Nathan Jahnke

Buckner is the top player available in this scenario and also fills the team’s top need. His QB 67 pressures were the most for interior linemen in college last year.

4. Dallas Cowboys: Joey Bosa, DE, Ohio State

General manager: Ben Stockwell

We had a deal with San Francisco to move back to No. 7 and pick up extra picks, but the Eagles’ trade up to No. 2 changed that. Bosa isn’t a bad consolation prize, as the No. 1 overall prospect on the PFF draft board. He was the top-graded edge defender in college football each of the past two years, and could plug right in at defensive end in the Cowboys’ 4-3 base defense.

5. Jacksonville Jaguars: Jalen Ramsey, CB, Florida State

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

With the expectation that Wentz would still be on the board here once Cleveland passed on him, we had a deal in place with San Francisco for their first-, third- and fifth-round picks (in exchange for our first- and seventh-round selections), but as it turned out the 49ers got a better deal moving up to No. 4. This left Jalen Ramsey, our No. 2 overall player in the draft still on the board, so despite a measure of disappointment in not accumulating extra picks, we ended up with one of our top prospects. Ramsey is PFF’s top-graded CB in the 2016 draft class (No. 8 coverage grade, No. 1 versus the run), and is capable of being a dominant player in all schemes versus both the pass and run.

6. Baltimore Ravens: Laremy Tunsil, OT, Ole Miss

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

The draft falls in a way that allows the Ravens to land a top-rated prospect at number six. They don’t need a starting left tackle in 2016, but the best offensive tackle that they have drafted since Jonathan Ogden has the chance to solidify the left tackle spot for the next decade. Tunsil allowed just five hurries in 2015, with no sacks or hits allowed, giving him a pass-blocking efficiency rating of 98.3.

7. San Francisco 49ers: Corey Coleman, WR, Baylor

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

PFF has Coleman ranked as a top-10 prospect in this class, and the Niners really struggled at the receiver position last season, with big-money free agent Torrey Smith earning a negative grade. Coleman’s quickness as a route-runner and after the catch, combined with his deep-threat ability, would give San Francisco a talented target out wide.

8. Cleveland Browns: Myles Jack, LB, UCLA

General manager: John Kosko

Even after trading back, the Browns still land one of the six best players in this class in Jack. Prior to his injury in 2015, Jack was one of the nation’s top-graded linebackers in 2014, excelling in coverage in addition to performing well against the run and as a pass-rusher. He could be a star in the Browns’ defense.

9. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Shaq Lawson, DE, Clemson

General manager: Michael Mountford

Lawson is the clear-cut No. 2 edge defender prospect in this class behind Joey Bosa, and would be a great fit in Tampa’s 4-3 base defense as an end who can both set the edge in the running game and produce as a pass-rusher with his power.

10. Tennessee Titans (from New York Giants): Josh Doctson, WR, TCU

*Titans trade pick Nos. 15, 64, and 140 to Giants for pick No. 10.

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

The expectation is that the Titans will be looking to spend a premium pick to upgrade their tackle situation, but we instead wanted to target either Corey Coleman or Josh Doctson, both playmaking WRs we had top-10 grades for. Once Coleman went off the board we knew we’d need to be aggressive in order to lock up Doctson, and fortunately we were able make a deal with the Giants (giving up Nos. 15, 64 and 140) that still left us with a number of power pieces in the draft. Doctson can do it all as an outside receiver, a position we found necessary to fill because the current roster lacks perimeter talent outside of Dorial Green-Beckham, who is at this stage an unproven commodity. Doctson’s QBs at TCU had a rating of 149.1 when throwing the ball his way, tops in the draft class (Coleman’s QBs rated 133.1 on his targets).

11. Chicago Bears: Ronnie Stanley, OT, Notre Dame

General manager: Matt Claassen

We strongly considered Ohio State RB Ezekiel Elliott here to replace Matt Forte, but ultimately decided on Stanley to fill the tackle spot opposite new free-agent addition Bobby Massie. Stanley is aruably the best pass-protecting tackle in the draft and would be a much-needed upgrade for a Chicago offensive line that had just one starter with a positive pass-blocking grade in 2015.

12. New Orleans Saints: Sheldon Rankins, DT, Louisville

General manager: Thomas Maney

Rankins is the best player available here, as the second-highest-graded interior defender over last two seasons. The Saints could use some help on their defensive line.

13. Miami Dolphins: Ezekiel Elliott, RB, Ohio State

General manager: Wes Huber

Elliott checks all of the necessary boxes at pick No. 13 for Miami. Best player available, generational back, and Lamar Miller replacement. The steal of the draft to this point, Elliott will immediately step onto the field as one of the best blocking running backs in the NFL. The Dolphins add the most productive back in the draft after contact (3.61 yards after contact per attempt) who will improve Adam Gase’s offense in every dimension.

14. Oakland Raiders: Chris Jones, DT, Mississippi State

General manager: Jon Abbott

Jones is the best player remaining on the board, having finished with the highest pass-rushing grade from any eligible player from the SEC. He shows great power and explosiveness in both pass-rushing and run defense, with room to grow as a player. He should make a formidable pass-rush with Khalil Mack on the defensive line.

15. New York Giants (from Tennessee): Jack Conklin, OT, Michigan State

General manager: Chris Phillips

After just missing out on Myles Jack, we moved back five spots and picked up the first picks in each of the third and fifth rounds. Conklin, the No. 2 tackle on our board and third-highest-graded tackle of 2015, fills a glaring need for the Giants.

16. Detroit Lions: William Jackson III, CB, Houston

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

The Lions are getting possibly the best pure corner in the draft in Jackson. He’s got excellent coverage skills, he’s physical, he’s athletic, he’s aggressive and he had the second-highest coverage grade in the class. The Lions won’t have to throw him to the wolves right away, as he and Darius Slay should form a fantastic corner duo.

17. Atlanta Falcons: Vernon Hargreaves, CB, Florida

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

A little regret here, not because of the pick, but because we had a deal on the table to move back two spots and pick up extra picks and Hargreaves would have still been on the board. Either way, we were comfortable with Hargreaves or Georgia OLB Leonard Floyd, and got one of the top 10-12 players in the draft. We were not expecting Hargreaves to fall this far, and he’s a perfect fit for Atlanta’s cover-3 scheme. Our No. 2 coverage cornerback in 2014 has excellent ball skills, and he closes quickly to go along with the best movement skills of any corner in the draft.

18. Indianapolis Colts: Cody Whitehair, G, Kansas State

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

Whitehair is far and away the best guard in the draft, and an immediate upgrade to the Colts’ interior offensive line. He’s got very few, if any, negatives to his game, allowing just 21 pressures combined the last two years. His technical ability is superb, as he nearly always puts himself in the perfect position to make a great block.

19. Tennessee Titans (from Buffalo): Leonard Floyd, OLB, Georgia

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

Yes, Brian Orakpo and Derrick Morgan are both solid players on the edge, but neither is an elite pass-rusher and Floyd has the athletic ability to be just that. He was the No. 14 player on our board, but we were surprised to still see him available at No. 19 considering he has the highest ceiling of any pass rusher in the draft class. While his pressure totals suffered some because he dropped into coverage more than 40 percent of his snaps the past two seasons, he generated pressure on 17.8 percent of his pass rushes. By comparison, Joey Bosa, our top edge defender each of the last two years, generated pressure on 16.8 percent of his rushes the past two seasons. Not only were we able to turn the bounty of picks from the Rams into two elite prospects in Doctson and Floyd (without, of course, sacrificing the 2017 first- and third-rounders gained in the deal), we still have selections in the 2nd and 3rd rounds. Trade details: Buffalo gets Nos. 33 and 45 in exchange for Nos. 19 and 156.

20. New York Jets: Shilique Calhoun, OLB, Michigan State

General manager: Zoltan Buday

The Jets thought of trading down to collect some additional picks, but they could not let both Floyd and Calhoun both get away. Denver showed what a good edge rush can do to the Patriots’ offense, and Calhoun had the second-highest pass-rush grade (+44.0) among edge rushers in 2015. He recorded five sacks in less than 2.5 seconds, so he has the ability to disrupt the Patriots’ passing game even when Brady’s not holding on to the ball for long.

21. Washington Redskins: Mackensie Alexander, CB, Clemson

General manager: Michael Mountford

Washington needs secondary players, and we thought long and hard about WVU safety Karl Joseph here, but went with adding Alexander here instead. Alexander allowed a catch every 20.7 snaps in 2015, the fifth-best rate in the draft class.

22. Houston Texans: Sterling Shepard, WR, Oklahoma

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

New QB Brock Osweiler gets a new toy in slot receiver Shepard, who separates as well as any wide receiver in the class and posted our top receiving grade in college football last season. He can produce as a high-volume slot receiver, but he can also win on the outside while providing a nice complement to DeAndre Hopkins.

23. Carolina Panthers (from Minnesota): Karl Joseph, S, West Virginia

General manager: John Kosko

Knowing Pittsburgh needed a safety as well, I had to make a move up to get the player I wanted. Joseph saw his season cut short due to a torn ACL, but make no mistake about it, the West Virginia Mountaineer was a force to be reckoned with when healthy. He graded as the No. 22 safety in this class, despite logging just a quarter of the snaps as everyone else. At the time of his injury, he was our third-highest-graded safety and had five interceptions already. He is physical against the run and shows great range when playing deep. Joseph can do it all at the safety position.

24. Cincinnati Bengals: Jarran Reed, DI, Alabama

General manager: Mike Renner

Domata Peko has been little more than a placeholder at nose tackle in Cincinnati for some time now. The Bengals get the chance to add easily the top run-stuffing nose tackle in this class in Reed, whose 13.4 run-stop percentage led the FBS last season.

25. Pittsburgh Steelers: Michael Thomas, WR, Ohio State

General manager: Bobby Slowik

A nightmare scenario for the Steelers here, as they are in desperate need of a DB with no clean fit on the board. Pittsburgh can force a CB here or reach for an OLB/OL. With no suitors interested in a trade, they instead go with the best player available and add to the riches Big Ben has at his disposal. Thomas has only dropped five catchable balls in the last two years.

26. Seattle Seahawks: Andrew Billings, DI, Baylor

General manager: Ben Stockwell

The Seahawks find an immediate and long-term replacement for Brandon Mebane, who never replicated his 2013 form after the Super Bowl run. Billings’ 25 run-stops were tied for ninth-most among defensive tackles in this class.

27. Green Bay Packers: Jonathan Bullard, DI, Florida

General manager: Mike Renner

Linebacker is the obvious need for Green Bay, but we’re not drafting for need here. Bullard can play base-end for the Packers and immediately make an impact versus the run. The former Gator had the highest run-defense grade of anyone in the country a year ago.

28. Kansas City Chiefs: Sheldon Day, DI, Notre Dame

General manager: John Breitenbach

None of the Chiefs’ defensive lineman recorded positive grades rushing the passer in 2015. Mike DeVito retired, and Dontari Poe failed to produce his best form. Day is one of the best interior pass-rushers in this class, and has the versatility to line up in any scheme. He’ll probably be limited to specialized pass-rusher early in his career, but would finally provide an interior presence to collapse the pocket in Kansas City.

29. Arizona Cardinals: Ryan Kelly, C, Alabama

General manager: Jordan Plocher

The Cardinals tried to trade back here to acquire more picks due to their lack of a second-round pick, but couldn’t find any takers. Arizona has long needed an upgrade at center. Kelly didn’t allow a sack all season in the SEC, and can step in as an instant starter.

30. Tampa Bay Buccaneers (from Carolina, through Minnesota): Noah Spence, OLB, Eastern Kentucky

General manager: Michael Mountford

Tampa Bay missed out on the top two edge defenders, and needed to make sure the Bucs moved back into the first to come away with one of the last two EDs left of note. Spence recorded eight total pressures in the two games PFF graded for Eastern Kentucky, and another seven in the Senior Bowl game.

31. Denver Broncos: Robert Nkemdiche, DI, Ole Miss

General manager: Sam Monson

Denver lost a lot of pieces of that defense after they won the Super Bowl. Nkemdiche isn’t a perfect prospect, but he can be productive from day one in sub-packages, and has huge upside down the road.

Round 2 

32. San Diego Chargers (from Cleveland): Hunter Henry, TE, Arkansas

General manager: Nathan Jahnke
*San Diego traded picks 35 and 102 to Cleveland for picks 32 and 141*

The trade up ensures Dallas and any other potential trade partners don’t get Henry first. He is someone who fills both a short-term need with Ladarius Green leaving for Pittsburgh and long-term with Antonio Gates’ age. His 2.36 yards per route run were the most for draft eligible tight ends.

33. Buffalo Bills (from Tennessee): Reggie Ragland, LB, Alabama

General manager: Billy Moy
*Buffalo traded picks 19 and 156 to Tennessee for picks 33 and 45*

Best player available, paired with a perfect scheme fit, traded out of the first round and was still able to grab the guy who is 18th on the team big board. Preston Brown had a -38.2 overall grade last season — including a -22.9 grade against the run — and penciled in starter Tony Steward (a sixth-round pick last season) managed to put together a -2.0 overall grade (and miss two tackles) in just eight snaps last season. With Ragland, the Bills pick up a force at the inside linebacker position who Rex Ryan should love — Ragland was the only LB last season to finish with a +7.0 or better grade in all facets (coverage, run defense and pass rush).

34. Dallas Cowboys: Laquon Treadwell, WR, Ole Miss

General manager: Ben Stockwell

The Cowboys’ receiving corps struggled in Dez Bryant’s absence last season. Treadwell provides the balance of deep and intermediate production with dangerous after-the-catch ability; Treadwell forced 17 missed tackles for the Rebels last season.

35. New York Giants (from Cleveland via San Diego): Leonte Carroo, WR, Rutgers

*Giants traded pick Nos. 40 and 109 to Browns for pick Nos. 35 and 176

General manager: Chris Phillips

I thought Carroo was easily the best WR on the board and moved up five spots to get him. Carroo, Beckham, and a healthy Cruz will give Eli some great options. Carroo finished 2015 with a +17.8 overall grade despite playing only 363 snaps.

36. Baltimore Ravens: Eli Apple, CB, Ohio State

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

The Ravens currently have Shareece Wright scheduled to start at one cornerback spot in 2016. Wright (74.8) was tied for the 41st-best player grade amongst cornerbacks in the NFL last year, but the Ravens in the very least need to add a third corner. The knock on Apple is that he doesn’t make enough plays on the ball, with just one interception and four pass breakups. However, he also doesn’t allow much in coverage, giving up just 387 yards on throws into his coverage in 2015.

37. San Francisco 49ers: Kalan Reed, CB, Southern Mississippi

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

The Niners had the sixth-worst pass coverage grade in the NFL last season, and Reed has the ability to help fix the problem. Reed’s 14 passes defensed were third-most in the class and he added four interceptions for the Golden Eagles, and he also recorded the third-best coverage grade.

38. Cleveland Browns (from Jacksonville): Rashard Higgins, WR, Colorado State

General manager: John Kosko
*Cleveland traded picks 40 and 99 to Jacksonville for picks 38 and 103*

The Browns moved up two spots to grab the best WR from 2014. Higgins “took a step back” in 2015 as he graded as our seventh-best in the class in 2015. His production was still extremely good considering he lost his quarterback to the NFL and coach to the Florida Gators. Despite the big changes, Higgins was fifth in yards per route run at 3.45 — a six percent drop rate over the past two seasons, while also posting a TD to INT ratio of 25 to 2 when targeted during the same time frame. Arguably the best route runner in the class, Higgins will be productive from day one in the NFL.

39. Minnesota Vikings (from Tampa Bay): Michael Thomas, WR, Southern Mississippi

General manager: Sam Monson
*Minnesota traded pick 30 to Tampa Bay for picks 39, 108 and 148*

I wasn’t planning on trading this far back, but when Karl Joseph was gone at No 30, I don’t see a big difference between Southern Miss MT and the top guys in the first round once past Coleman and Doctson. He has size, speed, athleticism, and his growth is far from complete. Snag a big target with limitless upside here, and pick up a bounty of picks to do so. Had an excellent PFF grade and is far better than the consensus take.

40. Jacksonville Jaguars (from Cleveland via New York Giants): Darron Lee, LB, Ohio State

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz
*Jacksonville traded pick 38 and 103 to Cleveland for picks 40 and 99*

A simpler scheme will help Darron Lee in Jacksonville, but his added value rushing the passer is the tipping point. He posted 19 total pressures in 2015 on 101 rushes, and we plan to utilize this skill.

41. Chicago Bears: Emmanuel Ogbah, EDGE, Oklahoma State

General manager: Matt Claassen

Ogbah is BPA here as he graded as the third-highest pass rusher among edge defenders in 2015 and one can never have too many pass rushers. Ogbah could rotate at OLB and potentially kick inside occasionally on passing downs. He would give the Bears additional pass rushing help on the edge and allow McPhee to move around even more on pass rushing downs.

42. Miami Dolphins: Su’a Cravens, LB, USC

General manager: Wes Huber

Cravens provides Miami with a great deal of versatility. Cravens is an excellent run defender (third-best run stop percent versus Power-5 and fourth-best overall), can get to the quarterback (most sacks and second-most pressures facing the Power-5), and can deliver assistance at several positions.

43. Tennessee Titans (from Philadelphia via Los Angeles): A’Shawn Robinson, DI, Alabama

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz
*Part of Foles-Bradford trade*

Robinson is a versatile run defender capable of playing all three interior positions well. He registered a stop on 10.7 of his run snaps, No. 3 in the class for 3-4 DEs.

44. Oakland Raiders: Kevin Byard, S, MTSU

General manager: Jon Abbott

The retirement of Charles Woodson leaves a hole at the FS spot for the Raiders with no great options on the roster. Byard finished seventh in coverage grade of all eligable defenders. If they still plan on playing single-high man coverage, Byard is the best option for that position in the draft

45. Buffalo Bills (from Tennessee via Los Angeles): Kyler Fackrell, EDGE, Utah State

General manager: Billy Moy
*Buffalo traded picks 19 and 156 to Tennessee for picks 33 and 45*

Fackrell provides the Bills with versatility off the edge. He was sixth among this class with a 15.7 pass rush productivity rating and he came away with a positive coverage grade last year after dropping into coverage 192 times.

46. Detroit Lions: Austin Johnson, DI, Penn State

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

Johnson was the highest player left on the Lions’ draft board, and should improve an interior defensive line that has seen better days in recent years. His run defense grade of +36.9 was the third-highest among interior defenders in the nation last season.

47. New Orleans Saints: Jaylon Smith, LB, Notre Dame

General manager: Thomas Maney

Sixth overall grade in LB class (+30.3). Long-term pick, worth the risk for what should have been a first-rounder if healthy.

48. Indianapolis Colts: Vernon Butler, DI, Louisiana Tech

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

Very surprising that Butler fell this far, and as the highest remaining player on our board, he was not going to be passed up. Last year he was top-10 in run stop percentage and top-20 in pass rush productivity among defensive tackles.

49. Buffalo Bills: Joshua Garnett, G, Stanford

General manager: Billy Moy

Garnett is the best pull-blocker in the class and has the potential to be among the league’s best-run blockers within Buffalo’s scheme. The right side of the offensive line needed to be addressed at some point, trading down out of the first round allowed for it to happen within the first 50 picks.

50. Atlanta Falcons: Adolphus Washington, DI, Ohio State

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

We didn’t love the options on the board at this point, but Washington brings another versatile interior presence that can play both 3 and 1-technique in Atlanta’s scheme. He had the third-best interior pass rush grade in the nation last season, and while he doesn’t excel in any one area, he is a strong all-around player reminiscent of Sharif Floyd.

51. Kansas City Chiefs (from New York Jets): Jason Spriggs, OT, Indiana

General manager: John Breitenbach
*Kansas City traded picks 59, 162 and 203 to New York for picks 51 and 241*

Andy Reid loves linemen, particularly tackles. Spriggs is mostly potential at this stage, but he’s more technically developed than the other physically gifted tackles in this class. Spriggs allowed just 12 combined pressures in 2015. His upside makes the risk worthwhile, especially toward the back end of Round 2. Despite his improvement, Eric Fisher has underperformed since being taken with the first overall pick in 2013. The Chiefs decided to move up to ensure Spriggs wasn’t taken by the tackle-needy Vikings or Seahawks.

52. Houston Texans: Jerell Adams, TE, South Carolina

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

More weapons for Osweiler, Adams is the best inline-blocking tight end in the draft and he has some wiggle at the top of his routes to create separation up the seam. He forced 10 missed tackles in 2015, tied for tops among tight ends in the class, all the more impressive when considering the poor QB situation at South Carolina.

53. San Diego Chargers: Nick Martin, C, Notre Dame

General manager: Nathan Jahnke

San Diego desperately needs a center, and there was a big gap between Martin and the next best center, so he was worth trading up to get. He didn’t allow a sack or hit last year, while Trevor Robinson — the Chargers’ center last year — allowed 12 combined sacks and hits which was the most for NFL centers

54. Minnesota Vikings: Taylor Decker, OT, Ohio State

General manager: Sam Monson

Vikings have already spent too long trying to reclaim Matt Kalil. Decker provides a legitimate option to replace him on the left side if he doesn’t improve quickly. He allowed only two sacks and 15 total pressures this past season and is another top end talent for the Vikings mid-way through the second round.

55. Cincinnati Bengals: Will Fuller, WR, Notre Dame

General manager: Mike Renner

What cornerback wants to face the Bengals? Take your pick of a top-5 WR in A.J. Green or the fastest receiver in college football a year ago. Fuller’s 708 yards on deep passes were the most among power-5 receivers.

56. Seattle Seahawks: Joe Thuney, OT, NC State

General manager: Ben Stockwell

The top-graded offensive tackle on the backside of inside zone last season. Whether at tackle or guard Thuney is going to be a valuable ally for Thomas Rawls opening up cutback lanes.

57. Green Bay Packers: Joe Schobert, EDGE, Wisconsin

General manager: Mike Renner

Schobert played an outside linebacker role at Wisconsin that doesn’t particularly exist in the NFL. Schobert’s uncanny ability to blitz, shed blocks and play on balance though makes him a perfect fit to slide into Clay Matthews’ inside linebacker/blitzer hybrid role. No edge player in the draft had a higher pass-rushing productivity.

58. Pittsburgh Steelers: De’Vante Harris, CB, Texas A&M

General manager: Bobby Slowik

The Steelers reach a bit to take a cornerback who fits their scheme extremely well. Harris only gave up one TD and 275 yards in his 2015 campaign, and may be the best player no one is talking about.

59. New York Jets (from Kansas City Chiefs): Paxton Lynch, QB, Memphis

General manager: Zoltan Buday

The Jets were comfortable trading back behind a couple teams that do not have a need at the quarterback position and picking up an extra draft pick in the process. Although there was a chance for the Broncos or the Browns trading up, the Jets end up with the third-best quarterback in this year’s class at the end of Round 2. Lynch had the highest accuracy percentage in this class when he was under pressure with 70.3 percent, which can come in handy with the way the Jets’ offensive line looks at times.

60. Chicago Bears (from New England): Kenneth Dixon, RB, Louisiana Tech

General manager: Matt Claassen

Dixon was available later than expected but wasn’t going to last until pick 72 and worth giving up a couple Day 3 picks to secure the No. 2. RB in the class, Jeremy Langford is a decent runner, but he can’t replace Forte’s receiving production. Dixon is the best and highest-graded receiver among the RB draft class as well as one of the best runners on zone and man-blocking schemes. His 99.2 elusive rating ranked second in the class.

61. New England Patriots (from Arizona): Hassan Ridgeway, DI, Texas

General manager: Jon Abbott
*Part of Chandler Jones trade*

Ridgeway fills a need at interior pass rusher after the loss of Easely. He ranked fifth in pass rush productivity among DTs. Has some postion versitility, which the Patriots love. His weakness is currently in run defense, which the Patriots have three able big bodies that can handle that in Branch, Brown and Knighton.

62. Minnesota Vikings (from Carolina): Justin Simmons, S, Boston College

General manager: Sam Monson

Simmons can be the rover box safety for the Vikings that allows Harrison Smith to be more of a ballhawk on the back end. He earned a positive PFF grade in every area PFF measure this past season and missed just five tackles all season as an in-the-box presence.

63. Denver Broncos: Connor Cook, QB, Michigan State

General manager: Sam Monson

With Lynch off the board the Broncos snag the last guy with all of the physical tools and at least some indication that he can put it all together and become a legit NFL QB. Cook has been inconsistent in college, but has shown the ability to win games and be a high-level player. Denver could reach for a QB in the first round, but they’re delighted to land Cook in the second.

Round 3

64. New England Patriots (from New York Giants via Tennessee): Kyle Murphy, OT, Stanford

General manager: Jon Abbott

*New England traded picks 72, 127 and 194 to New York for pick 64*

After some manuvering around the draft board to pick up a mid-round pick (the Patriots had no fourth- or fifth-round pick this year) the Patriots pick up a OT to back up Vollmer and Solder — a player that became a glaring weakness after injury. Murphy has very good fundamentals and is a fairly polished pass blocker — he finished sixth among Oower-5 OTs in pass blocking efficiency in 2014 before struggling a little with a move to LT.

65. Cleveland Browns: Bronson Kaufusi, EDGE, BYU

General manager: John Kosko

Kaufusi graded as PFF’s sixth-best interior defender in 2015 excelling as a pass rusher (+29.3, 5th in class and 13.2 pass rush productivity, good for 1st) and in run defense (12.1 run stop percentage, good for 2nd). Kaufusi is a solid overall athlete with a quick first step and arguably the best hands of any defensive lineman in the class. At 6-6 and 34.5 inch arms, Kaufusi has the length to keep offensive lineman off of him to shed blocks. He’ll need to work on staying low but this gives Cleveland a productive 5-tech for years to come.

66. Washington Redskins (from San Diego): Scooby Wright III, LB, Arizona

General manager: Michael Mountford

*San Diego traded picks 66 and 141 to Washington for pick 53*

I would have taken Martin at No. 53 but I needed to grab extra picks to help a defense lacking in talent. Adding Wright will help Washington, as the Redskins need talent all over the defense and Wright was one of college football’s highest-graded players in 2014 (he was injured most of last year). His coverage ability is a question mark, but he should be a good fit in Washington.

67. Dallas Cowboys: Jeremy Cash, LB/S, Duke

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Cash is projected as a hybrid linebacker-safety in the Deone Bucannon mold, and he’d bring a new element to a Dallas defense that needs help just about everywhere. Cash was PFF’s top-graded safety in 2015, excelling in particular against the run and as a pass-rusher.

68. San Francisco 49ers: Keyarris Garrett, WR, Tulsa

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Garrett is one of the more intriguing options in a deep receiving class. He can do some impressive things downfield, and had more yards on passes 20 yards or more downfield than all but one player in this draft class.

69. Jacksonville Jaguars: Carl Nassib, EDGE, Penn State

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

Nassib doesn’t have ideal measureables, but was an outstanding pass rusher at Penn State because of his savvy hand usage and excellent motor. He put this on display during Senior Bowl practices, winning 93 percent of one-on-one pass rushes throughout the week.

70. Baltimore Ravens: Kamalei Correa, EDGE, Boise State

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Correa has the 30th-best pass rushing grade in this class, but is a better all-around player than he is a pure pass rusher. He graded positively as a pass rusher, against the run and in coverage. This is a perfect spot for the player, and perfect player for the team to come in and learn behind Terrell Suggs for a year.

71. New York Giants: Isaac Seumalo, G, Oregon State

General manager: Chris Phillips

With Conklin and now Seumalo, the Giants get much more physical up front. Seumalo was our sixth-ranked guard with a +30.9 overall grade.

72. New York Giants (from New England via Chicago): Joshua Perry, LB, Ohio State

General manager: Chris Phillips
*New York traded pick 64 to England for picks 72, 127 and 196*

Finally, the board falls right for some defense. Perry gives the Giants a versatile linebacker who performed well both against the run (+7.8) and in coverage (+7.9).

73. Miami Dolphins: Maliek Collins, DI, Nebraska

General manager: Wes Huber

In order for the 4-3 defense to work, new DC Vance Joseph will need to contain the run. He gets that with Collins and adds a 3-technique that possesses pass rushing skills of his own (top-16 in pass rush productivity during both of the last two seasons).

74. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Nick VanHoose, CB, Northwestern

General manager: Michael Mountford

VanHoose is a good fit for a zone-heavy scheme Tampa Bay needs help on every level of the defense, and so far they’ve added on each level to try and improve the defense. VanHoose was the highest-graded corner in coverage last season, and allowed a catch percentage of 43.8 percent.

75. Oakland Raiders: Nick Kwiatkoski, LB, West Virginia

General manager: Jon Abbott

With LB one of the biggest needs for the Raiders heading into the draft, they address it with Nick Kwiatkoski. He was the best LB on the board. He finished fourth in the nation in run defense grade and sixth in pass coverage for all LBs.

76. Tennessee Titans (from Los Angeles): Cyrus Jones, CB, Alabama

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz
*Part of Rams-Titans #1 overall trade*

Jones is ready to start immediately, whether it be in the slot our outside will likely depend on how the rest of our roster looks come August. He had five INTs and siz PBUs the past two seasons, and he’s a huge value with this pick as he was No. 44 on our draft board.

77. Cleveland Browns (from Philadelphia): C.J. Prosise, RB, Notre Dame

General manager: John Kosko

Running back is a need for Cleveland, as 2015 third-rounder Duke Johnson is not an every-down option due to his size, so the combination of Prosise and Johnson is an intriguing pairing. Prosise is one of the most explosive backs in this draft with the ability to catch passes out of the backfield, similar to Johnson.

78. New Orleans Saints: Kevin Dodd, EDGE, Clemson

General manager: Thomas Maney

Another edge rusher opposite Cameron Jordan. Dodd’s 44 defensive stops were the most in this edge class, while is overall grade (+37.1) ranked ninth.

79. Philadelphia Eagles: Javon Hargrave, DI, South Carolina State

General manager: John Breitenbach

Hargrave’s athleticism makes him an ideal fit in Jim Schwartz’s aggresssive front. He can fire off the ball from the one-technique position next to Fletcher Cox and wreak havoc in the backfield. It remains to be seen whether Bennie Logan can adjust from the two-gap nose tackle position he played under the previous regime, and the remaining backups are certainly ill-suited, making defensive tackle a pressing need.

80. Buffalo Bills: Darian Thompson, S, Boise State

General manager: Billy Moy

Rex Ryan and the Buffalo defense gets another dynamic player in Thompson. Thompson’s +6.4 coverage grade was 15th among this class of safeties (his +13.1 coverage grade last season was 1st among this group) and he was third in the class in 2015 with a 7.4 run stop percentage.

81. Atlanta Falcons: Christian Westerman, G, Arizona State

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

We are thrilled to get Westerman here, perhaps the best pass-blocking guard in the draft and the movement skills to run block in Atlanta’s zone-blocking scheme. He’s different from a lot of the mauling guards in the class, closer to a tackle than anything, and his win percentage in pass rush drills at Senior Bowl practice ranked third among offensive linemen.

82. Indianapolis Colts: Paul Perkins, HB, UCLA

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

Perkins is someone that all Colts fans should get excited about. He forced 85 missed tackles last season and his elusive rating of 115.0 was first in the nation. With Frank Gore as the Colts’ starting RB, it allows Perkins to come in as a change-of-pace back while developing until he can take over full-time once Gore is gone.

83. New York Jets: Steven Daniels, LB, Boston College

General manager: Zoltan Buday

The best available guard and running back went off the board just before the Jets so they decided to rather address a need in the defense. While Daniels has his limitations in coverage, he is the best run defender in this class and can contribute by rushing the passer as well. Daniels’ run stop percentage is third among inside linebackers this year with 15.3 percent and he recorded 10 defensive stops in two separate games in 2015.

84. Washington Redskins: Kenny Clark, DI, UCLA

General manager: Michael Mountford

Best player available, Washington needs help on the DL and Clark should be able to play DE in a 3-4. Tried to trade down, but the run on players before meant no one was willing to move up. Clark had the 12th-best overall grade, and was very solid in both the run and the pass game.

85. Houston Texans: Vonn Bell, S, Ohio State

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

This was a close decision between Bell and an interior defensive lineman, but we think Bell fits Houston’s two-high safety style while bringing the ability to dabble in a center field role. He’s not a powerful tackler, but he can make the plays that come to him and he matches up in coverage better than most safeties in the class, making a great fit for Houston’s quarters scheme.

86. Minnesota Vikings: Derrick Henry, RB, Alabama

General manager: Sam Monson

Life after Adrian Peterson isn’t far away, and the Vikings don’t have a plan in place for that day. I have reservations about Henry, but in the third round I’m all aboard. Henry was a complete workhorse for Alabama last season and notched over 1,300 yards after contact. Not needing to be that workhorse again in year one might even help his future prospects, giving him a chance to recover from that brutal workload.

87. Cincinnati Bengals: Xavien Howard, CB, Baylor

General manager: Mike Renner

Howard is a boom-or-bust player with high upside. His athletic traits say first round, but his production doesn’t match up. He may have only allowed a 32.2 passer rating last season, but he benefitted from a good number of poorly thrown deep balls.

88. Green Bay Packers: Tyler Higbee, TE, Western Kentucky

General manager: Mike Renner
Jared Cook is only on a one-year deal and that’s not stopping me from taking the most dynamic receiving threat in this tight end class. Higbee might be a tad inexperienced with only 803 snaps over the past two seasons, but his 2.3 yards per route were the second-best in the class.

89. Pittsburgh Steelers: Tavon Young, CB, Temple

General manager: Bobby Slowik
Young can bump inside to the slot and has the ability to match WRs as well as play zone. He will need to clean up his clumsy footwork at the top of routes to succeed at the next level. Opposing QBs had a passer rating of 46.9 when targeting him in 2014.

90. Seattle Seahawks: Jordan Howard, RB, Indiana

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Howard forced 103 missed tackles while gaining more than 1,600 yards after first contact over the last two seasons for Indiana and UAB. Another tackle-breaking ball carrier who can overcome subpar blocking.

Kansas City Chiefs forfeit the 28th pick in Round 3

91. New England Patriots: Tyler Boyd, WR, Pittsburgh

General manager: Jon Abbott

Very versitile receiver. Spent 318 of his 589 snaps as an outside receiver and another 233 in the slot. Ran a diverse route tree at Pitt and his position versitility and route running would fit well with the Patriots. He also has reliable hands — only five drops of 131 catchable passes this season.

92. Arizona Cardinals: Dean Lowry, EDGE, Northwestern

General manager: Jordan Plocher

Lowry is one of the higher players left on the draft board and also fills an area of need for the Cardinals. Lowry is a versatile and well-rounded defensive linemen posting a +19.1 pass rush grade and an +18.6 run defense grade last season.

93. Carolina Panthers: Shon Coleman, OT, Auburn

General manager: John Kosko

The top-ranked player left on the Panthers’ draft board, Coleman will immediately step in and compete for the starting RT spot. Already a solid run blocker, Coleman graded as PFF’s fifth-best OT in run blocking. He’ll need to develop as a pass blocker but he has the tools to do so.

94. Denver Broncos: Thomas Duarte, TE, UCLA

General manager: Sam Monson

The Broncos haven’t really replaced Julius Thomas as a receiving threat from the TE position. Thomas Duarte is one of the best move-TEs in the draft, and can provide the big, matchup problem that Thomas once did. He won’t need to be much of a blocker, because the Broncos already have players like Virgil Green in place, but he can be an impact receiver from the get go.

95. Detroit Lions (Compensatory): Matt Skura, C, Duke

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

We’re very happy that Matt Skura was available here, to help upgrade the Lions’ interior offensive line. He posted the third-highest run block grade last season among centers at +31.0, but allowed no sacks and just 14 pressures.

96. New England Patriots (Compensatory): Alex Collins, RB, Arkansas

General manager: Jon Abbott

Patriots fill a need here with a tough, physical, downhill runner, who should fit in with Blount nicely as an in-between-the-tackles RB. Collins graded eighth overall for RBs in this draft class, and he has good quickness when blocking breaks down to keep the offense going.

97. Seattle Seahawks (Compensatory): Joe Dahl, OT, Washington State

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Adept in pass protection surrendering only 18 pressures for the Cougars in 2015, Dahl raised his game as a run blocker last season as well. He could end up sliding inside to guard or center and can offer competition all along an offensive line that desperately needs it.

98. Denver Broncos (Compensatory): Kentrell Brothers, LB, Missouri

General manager: Sam Monson

The Broncos need linebackers after losing Danny Trevathan in free agency. Brothers is an excellent linebacker who just doesn’t fit the NFL spec-sheet in terms of measurables. The bottom line is that even if he’s only a two-down player, that’s all the Broncos really need out of him with that defense, and he’ll make a positive impact on those downs.

Round 4

99. Jacksonville Jaguars (from Cleveland): Darius Latham, DT, Indiana

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

Latham was a super productive pass-rusher from the inside at Indiana and finished with our No. 5 pass-rush grade for DTs, ahead of players like Robert Nkemdiche, Andrew Billings, Vernon Butler, Hassan Ridgeway and Maliek Collins, all drafted ahead of him here.

100. Cleveland Browns: Taveze Calhoun, CB, Mississippi State

General manager: John Kosko

The Browns need to add depth at the cornerback position, and Calhoun is a physical corner who excels in press-man coverage. He allowed a QB rating of just 40 in 2015, suggesting he can compete for a role immediately in Cleveland’s secondary.

101. Dallas Cowboys: Devontae Booker, RB, Utah

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Equally adept at breaking tackles after a catch (14) or as a runner (57), Booker’s skills in the passing game make him different than Darren McFadden and Alfred Morris, but his prowess as a runner make him a threat to take snaps on more than just third downs.

102. Cleveland Browns (from San Diego): Cody Kessler, QB, USC

General manager: John Kosko

Kessler wouldn’t have pressure on him to start right away here. The former USC Trojan was our third-highest-graded passer in 2014 before dropping to 11th-best in the 2015 class. Kessler has excellent accuracy under 20 yards and is great under pressure with 19 TDs and 5 INTs the past two seasons. While he did regress in 2015, coaching changes can account for some of that.

103. Cleveland Browns (from Jacksonville): Daniel Braverman, WR, Western Michigan

General manager: John Kosko

Browns fans might bemoan taking another small receiver, but Braverman is a younger version of Julian Edelman. Fast, quick, and with great separation skills, Braverman adds versatility to the Browns passing attack. With second-round pick Rashard Higgins, third-round pick C.J. Prosise, Duke Johnson, Andrew Hawkins and now Braverman, Cleveland suddenly has a solid group of pass-catchers with sure hands.

104. Baltimore Ravens: Malcolm Mitchell, WR, Georgia

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

This season saw Mitchell trying to return from an injury early in his college career. While he wasn’t always consistent, the flashes of real talent were there, including forcing 13 missed tackles on 59 receptions.

105. San Francisco 49ers: Anthony Zettel, DE/DT, Penn State

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Zettel was the ninth-highest-graded interior D-lineman in the nation in 2014 and ranked fourth as a pass-rusher before taking a bit of a step back last year. He may need to get stronger to play well against the run as a 3-4 defensive end in the Niners defense, opposite 2015 first-rounder Arik Armstead, but he can contribute right away in a rotation or sub-packages as a pass-rusher (a big need for San Francisco).

106. Chicago Bears: Ronald Blair, Edge, Appalachian State

General manager: Matt Claassen

You can never have too many pass-rushers in today’s NFL, and Blair has the ability play on the edge in base formations and inside as a pass-rusher, where he had the fourth-highest pass-rush productivity in 2015. He’d be a nice addition to Chicago’s defense.

107. Miami Dolphins: David Morgan II, TE, UTSA

General manager: Wes Huber

By adding Morgan, Miami will have a TE2 to combine with Ezekiel Elliott to greatly improve its overall blocking. Morgan produced a run-blocking production grade 43 percent higher than any other TE in the nation last season, allowing only four total pressures over the last two seasons as well as only dropping three passes (4.4 percent drop rate).

108. Minnesota Vikings (from Tampa Bay): Will Anthony, DE/OLB, Navy

General manager: Sam Monson

I don’t know what you do with Anthony yet, but I know he’s a football player who can produce. Anthony played 3-4 DE for Navy at under 250 pounds, and he’ll likely be a 4-3 DE for the Vikings and a project player who can contribute in a rotation. He had 41 total pressures and the fifth-highest grade in the nation for defensive interior players this past season.

109. New York Giants (from New York Giants via Browns): Matt Johnson, QB, Bowling Green

General manager: Chris Phillips
The Cleveland Browns traded pick No. 109 to the New York Giants for picks No. 127 and No. 149.

Eli Manning is 35, so this gives the Giants a QB to develop. With six picks still left, it was an easy decision to move up. Johnson was our highest-graded QB in 2015 and led all QBs with 20 touchdown passes on passes over 20 yards downfield.

110. Los Angeles Rams: Braxton Miller, WR, Ohio State

General manager: Jordan Plocher

There was a need to get another weapon for Goff. Miller forced eight missed tackles on only 28 receptions, so the athleticism and playmaking ability are there, even though he is short on positional experience.

111. Detroit Lions: Le’Raven Clark, OT, Texas Tech

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

Clark is a player the Lions can work with. His run-block success rate last season was 93.7 percent, fifth-best in the nation. But his pass blocking is a work in progress. He has an insane amount of upside, and we’re counting on the Lions being able to develop him into a strong starting offensive tackle.

112. New Orleans Saints: Pharoh Cooper, WR, South Carolina

General manager: Thomas Maney

He’s an elusive slot receiver with good production despite below-average QB play. He earned the 27th-ranked receiving grade last season, forcing 33 missed tackles over the last two years.

113. Los Angeles Rams (from Philadelphia): Spencer Drango, G, Baylor

General manager: Jordan Plocher

Drango is a versatile lineman who played tackle, but we think he is a better fit at guard. He can open holes for Gurley and posted a +29.7 run-blocking grade last season which was the second-highest grade among the tackles in this class.

114. Oakland Raiders: Matt Ioannidis, DT, Temple

General manager: Jon Abbott

Ioannidis’ 10 QB hits were the sixth-most in this draft class for an interior defender, and he capped off his season with an excellent performance at the Senior Bowl. He’ll add yet another pass-rushing option to a Raiders defense that looks like it could be very formidable in 2016.

115. Atlanta Falcons: Demarcus Robinson, WR, Florida

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

A character risk, but Robinson has great potential on the outside. He can separate on intermediate routes and make plays down the field and he has the potential to develop into a true No. 2 receiver opposite Julio Jones. With Mohamed Sanu under contract, taking a chance on Robinson’s upside is worth the risk at this point in the draft, and if he does develop, Matt Ryan will have a much easier time after the Atlanta passing offense was extremely one-dimensional a year ago.

116. Washington Redskins (from Indianapolis): Jack Allen, C, Michigan State

General manager: Michael Mountford

We had to trade up four spots and swap fifth-round picks to make sure Washington solidified the center spot — the only negative graded position last year. Allen graded inside the top 10 in run-blocking in both 2014 and 2015.

117. Buffalo Bills: Devin Lucien, WR, Arizona State

General manager: Billy Moy

He has questionable top-end speed, but is a solid route-runner, has the ability to separate, has arguably the best hands in the class (just five drops over the past two seasons despite poor QB play) and has good run-after-the-catch ability. Buffalo lost both Percy Harvin (retirement) and Chris Hogan (FA to NE) this offseason and Robert Woods has a -9.8 receiving grade in his first three seasons.

118. New York Jets: Joe Haeg, OT, North Dakota State

General manager: Zoltan Buday

Although the Jets know who their starters will be at tackle in Week 1, neither Giacomini nor Clady can be viewed as long-term solutions at the position. This is an ideal situation for Haeg who will need time to make the transition from the FCS to the NFL, but can turn into a solid starter. He was at his best in pass protection, where he allowed only one sack on 238 pass-block snaps.

119. Houston Texans: Sebastian Tretola, G, Arkansas

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

One of the best power-blocking guards in the draft, Tretola will push Xavier Su’a-Filo for a starting spot immediately. Tretola can create movement at the point of attack, finishing eighth in the draft class as a run-blocker at +20.7, though his pass protection is worrisome. Either way, a potential starter in the fourth round is good value.

120. Indianapolis Colts (from Washington): Willie Henry, DI, Michigan

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver
The Washington Redskins traded picks No. 120 and No. 141 to the Indianapolis Colts for picks No. 116 and No. 155.

Although the Colts already added an interior defender, Henry was just too good to pass up. He’s as explosive as they get, and he finished sixth among defensive tackles last season with a 10.2 pass-rush productivity score. He’ll likely be limited to a pass-rushing role at first, but could develop into an every-down player.

121. Carolina Panthers (from Minnesota): Cre’Von LeBlanc, CB, Florida Atlantic

General manager: John Kosko

Lacking ideal height, LeBlanc plays bigger than his size. He doesn’t get outmuscled by bigger receivers and can play in both man and zone. LeBlanc allowed just 39 percent of his targets to be caught and had 10 pass disruptions in 2015.

122. Cincinnati Bengals: Artie Burns, CB, Miami

General manager: Mike Renner

The Bengals stock up on high-upside corners hoping to hit a home run. Burns has all the athletic traits, but his feel in zone isn’t at an NFL level just yet. He still managed 10 combined picks and pass breakups a year ago — the 12th-best figure in this class.

123. Pittsburgh Steelers: Jayron Kearse, S, Clemson

General manager: Bobby Slowik

Kearse is a talented player who was in the top 20 in overall grade and was positive in run and coverage. Although he is willing in all phases of the game, Jayron needs to improve his mentality and effort to become a solid starter and difference-maker in the back end.

124. Seattle Seahawks: Max Tuerk, C, USC

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Tuerk’s final season at USC was cut short by injury, but prior to that he earned positive grades as a run-blocker and pass protector in each of his five starts in 2015.

125. Green Bay Packers: Jatavis Brown, LB, Akron

General manager: Mike Renner

The Packers are as sub-package heavy as it gets, and now they’ll forray into the hybrid linebacker game. Brown is not a run defender, but he has coverage skills like a safety and was possibly the best blitzer in the FBS last year, collecting 15 sacks from an off-ball position.

126. Kansas City Chiefs: Vernon Adams Jr., QB, Oregon

General manager: John Breitenbach

A former quarterback’s coach, Andy Reid considers adding a signal-caller in every draft. Backup Chase Daniel left in free agency and Alex Smith is only an adequate starter. Adams has incredible upside. Few QBs throw the ball as accurately down the field into tight coverage. Adams is also one of the few QBs to come alive once the designed play breaks down, similar to Russell Wilson. Reid was planning to take Wilson in the third round back in 2012, but settled for Nick Foles after missing out. He avoids making the same mistake with another undersized, mobile QB.

127. Cleveland Browns (from Patriots via Giants): Elandon Roberts, LB, Houston

General manager: John Kosko

Roberts led the nation in run-stop percentage at 16.0 and has the speed to stay in on-coverage downs. He’s productive as a pass rusher as well with six sacks and 11 hits, Roberts has the qualities to become a solid all-around linebacker at the next level. While he is a bit undersized, his frame does have room to grow and there is no denying his willingness and ability to take on blocks and shed them.

128. Arizona Cardinals: Will Redmond, CB, Mississippi State

General manager: Jordan Plocher

Redmond is a 6-foot-tall cornerback with back-to-back years of positive PFF coverage grades in the SEC. You can never have enough corners and Redmond has proven he can play when healthy.

129. Carolina Panthers: Demarcus Ayers, WR, Houston

General manager: John Kosko

Ayers gives QB Cam Newton a slot receiver, which is a big need. Ayers will give Newton targets at all depths of the field with the ability to create after the catch. Ayers forced 19 missed tackles and graded as PFF’s 12th-highest receiver in this draft class. With just two drops on 101 catchable passes, Ayers also provides arguably the best hands of any receiver in this class.

130. Baltimore Ravens (from Denver): B.J. Goodson, LB, Clemson

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

A solid all-around player, Goodson graded positively in coverage, against the run and as a pass-rusher. His 62 tackles resulting in a defensive stop were seventh among LBs in this draft class.

131. Green Bay Packers (compensatory selection): Kenyan Drake, RB, Alabama

General manager: Mike Renner

James Starks is on the wrong side of 30 and his contract isn’t prohibitive. Drake has issues with pass protection, but he’s a dynamic third-down and change-of-pace back. He broke 22 tackles on only 77 attempts last year.

132. Baltimore Ravens (compensatory selection): Yannick Ngakoue, OLB, Maryland

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

You can never have too many pass-rushers, and Ngakoue had the 13th-highest pass-rush grade among edge defenders in this class. He registered 13 sacks, 10 hits and 34 hurries in 2015.

133. San Francisco 49ers (compensatory selection): Kendall Fuller, CB, Virginia Tech

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Dontae Johnson was our 55th-ranked cornerback last year, so rolling the dice on Fuller makes sense. Injury ruined his 2015 season, but he had 10 pass breakups in 2014.

134. Baltimore Ravens (compensatory selection): Brandon Doughty, QB, Western Kentucky

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

With four fourth-round picks, it seemed like the ideal spot to grab a QB to develop behind Joe Flacco. The Ravens struggled when he went down last year, and Doughty had the highest adjusted accuracy rate in the nation at 81.8 percent.

135. Dallas Cowboys (compensatory selection): Kevin Hogan, QB, Stanford

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Hogan carried his improvement from the end of 2014 into 2015 at Stanford. Hogan registered a higher passer rating against the blitz than against a base pass rush.

136. Denver Broncos (compensatory selection): Nila Kasitati, G, Oklahoma

General manager: Sam Monson

Kasitati has some blocks that make him look like an All-Pro in waiting, but he is far too inconsistent right now to be a high pick in the draft. At this point, however, he is worth the gamble for a team in need of line help.

137. Green Bay Packers (compensatory selection): Tyrone Holmes, EDGE, Montana

General manager: Mike Renner

An athletic freak with considerable upside, he was the highest-graded defender at the Shrine Game, with three pressures and a +4.2 overall grade.

138. Cleveland Browns (compensatory selection): Jordan Jenkins, OLB, Georgia

General manager: John Kosko

Jenkins graded well over last two years against the SEC and Power-5 competition, although his grade was slightly inflated by a monster game versus Vanderbilt in 2015. He’s not an elite athlete and didn’t grade that well as a pass-rusher. He could see more impact against the run, but his explosion off the ball is impressive at times.

139. Buffalo Bills (compensatory selection): Jeff Driskel, QB, Louisiana Tech

General manager: Billy Moy

Driskel is one of the more athletic, if not the most athletic, quarterbacks in this class, and he also had the 11th-highest passing grade (+22.0) in this year’s draft class in 2015. Hopefully he supplants EJ Manuel as Buffalo’s backup, as the former first-round pick has a -33.4 overall grade over his career.

Round 5

140. New York Giants (from Tennessee): Terrell Chestnut, CB, West Virginia

General manager: Chris Phillips

The Giants need depth at corner and can’t pass up the top CB left on the board. Quarterbacks only completed 42 percent of their passes when targeting Chestnut over the last two years.

141. Indianapolis Colts (from Cleveland via Washington via San Diego): Tyler Gray, LB, Boise State

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

Gray is a versatile player that can play any LB position in the Colts’ 3-4 defense, but he’ll slot in as a much-needed ILB. He graded out as the sixth-best linebacker last season, at +32.1, and that was despite playing at least 304 less snaps than anyone above him.

142. San Francisco 49ers (from San Diego): Byron Marshall, WR, Oregon

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Marshall missed most of the 2015 season due to injury, but is a versatile playmaker who can make an impact from the slot. He forced 10 missed tackles on 73 receptions in 2014.

143. Oakland Raiders (from Dallas): Eric Murray, CB, Minnesota

General manager: Jon Abbott

Eric Murray fits the mold of an NFL corner and plays with the physicality necessary in man-coverage. Murray did not surrender a TD in the 2015 season, and the hope is that he can continue his improvement into 2016.

144. Denver Broncos (from Baltimore): Germain Ifedi, OT, Texas A&M

General manager: Sam Monson

Beaten too often in college, Ifedi has all of the tools to make a good tackle at the next level, but needs some major work on his game to realize that potential. The former Aggie is worth the gamble at this spot for a team without much on the line.

145. San Francisco 49ers: Daniel Lasco, RB, California

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Like Marshall, Lasco was hurt for much of 2015, but dynamic in 2014. He forced 50 missed tackles as a runner over the past two seasons, despite missing time.

146. Jacksonville Jaguars: Mike Jordan, CB, Missouri Western

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

Jordan has excellent size and strength, and used his physical gifts well in college. He plays the ball in the air extremely well and appears to have the instincts to transition to the NFL level better than many of the FBS CB prospects.

147. Miami Dolphins: Landon Turner, G, North Carolina

General manager: Wes Huber

Turner produced the highest run-blocking production grade on inside zone assignments among all of the guards we charted. Adam Gase utilized an inside zone-blocking scheme on nearly 50 percent of rushing attempts in Chicago last season, and Turner will immediately have an opportunity to step in and seize the starting position at left guard.

148. Minnesota Vikings (from Tampa Bay): D.J. White, CB, Georgia Tech

General manager: Sam Monson

Looking for depth, the Vikings take a shot at an interesting cornerback in D.J.White. The Georgia Tech product had an excellent 2014 before a downturn in form this past season. He has excellent ball skills and the ability to challenge at the catch point, and seems like an ideal fit in the Vikings’ defense, given the coverages they run. He’d be another project for Mike Zimmer to work on in the secondary.

149. Cleveland Browns (from New York Giants): Austin Hooper, TE, Stanford

General manager: John Kosko

Hooper is a solid run-blocker (+16.7 two-season run-blocking grade) and pass-catcher. With good speed (4.72 40-yard dash) and size (6-foot-4, 254 pounds), Hooper will complement Gary Barnidge and immediately improve the TE group in terms of blocking—something that was sorely missing in 2015 for the Browns.

150. New England Patriots (from Chicago): Corey Tindal, CB, Marshall

General manager: Jon Abbott

Tindal is an extremely versatile corner who graded out well for us in many areas and projects to be in the slot. He graded out second among non-Power-5 draft-eligible corners, behind William Jackson III.

151. Detroit Lions: Nile Lawrence-Stample, DI, Florida State

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

The Lions still need some help with their interior defensive line, and Lawrence-Stample can be that help. He’s a big defensive tackle who can plug up the middle in the run game, as evidenced by his eighth-best run-stop percentage of 11.1 this past season among defensive tackles.

152. New Orleans Saints: Charles Tapper, ED, Oklahoma

General manager: Thomas Maney

Tapper provides more defensive line help for the Saints. He posted identical +13.8 pass-rush and run-defense grades last season.

153. Philadelphia Eagles: Graham Glasgow, G, Michigan

General manager: John Breitenbach

Glasgow was our top-ranked lineman in team drills, and in the game itself, during Senior Bowl week. He has the versatility to play a number of interior positions and will compete to dress on Sundays from day one.

154. Oakland Raiders: Aaron Burbridge, WR, Michigan State

General manager: Jon Abbott

Burbridge is a good route-runner and made some great catches in tight coverage. His downside was his drops; he had 10 in 146 catchable passes, which ranked 65th out of 96 eligible receivers.

Los Angeles Rams: Pick exercised in supplemental draft
General manager: Jordan Plocher

155. Washington Redskins (from Indianapolis): Brandon Allen, QB, Arkansas

General manager: Michael Mountford

With Colt McCoy as the backup, Washington needs a third QB to develop and either become the long-term backup, or possibly even start down the road. Allen had the fifth-highest passing grade, and only posted one game last season below -1.0.

156. Tennessee Titans (from Buffalo): Darrell Greene, G, San Diego State

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

Greene had the fourth-highest grade overall in run-blocking for guards, and does an excellent job of getting consistent movement off the ball.

Atlanta Falcons: Pick forfeited
General manager: Steve Palazzolo

157. Denver Broncos (from New York Jets): Nelson Spruce, WR, Colorado

General manager: Sam Monson

Keeping him in state, the Broncos take Nelson Spruce from the University of Colorado. Spruce caught 70.6 percent of passes thrown his way this past season, and is an interesting and reliable possession receiver.

158. Washington Redskins: Jonathan Williams, RB, Arkansas

General manager: Michael Mountford

The need for another running back was large at this point in the draft, and with Williams coming off a foot injury, the value of a fifth-round pick on the former Razorback seemed too good to pass up. In 2014, Williams had the fifth-highest elusive rating in the FBS.

159. Houston Texans: Kolby Listenbee, WR, TCU

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

Yet another playmaker for the Texans, they can now trot out a well-rounded receiving corps with Hopkins a true No.1, Shepard a great route-runner, and Listenbee as a deep threat. He ran under a 4.4 40-yard dash at the combine, despite injury; most importantly, he complements his speed with good downfield ball skills. Listenbee is one of the most underrated receivers in the draft.

160. Carolina Panthers (from Minnesota): Terrell Lathan, ED, TCU

General manager: John Kosko

Panthers need some pass-rushing edge defenders, and Lathan brings that to the table with solid run-defense ability. He won’t impress with his measurables, but his size gives him some versatility on the defensive line. Lathan had a higher pass-rushing productivity than Shilique Calhoun and Shaq Lawson, ranking 10th in the class.

161. Cincinnati Bengals: Keanu Neal, S, Florida

General manager: Mike Renner

Somehow, Neal dropped all the way to Round 5. He’s one of the best safeties moving forward in the draft, but he’ll have a steep learning curve in the NFL after a negative coverage grade last season.

162. New York Jets (from Kansas City): Tyler Ervin, RB, San Jose State

General manager: Zoltan Buday

Matt Forte cannot be considered a long-term option in New York. Ervin has a lot to learn in pass protection, but he had the second-highest receiving grade among running backs in this class, and did not drop a single pass in 2015.

163. Green Bay Packers: Nick Vigil, LB, Utah State

General manager: Mike Renner

Vigil doesn’t have the raw production his brother did, but he’s far more athletic. He graded out positively in all three phases (run defense, coverage, and pass rush).

164. Philadelphia Eagles (from Pittsburgh): Dadi Nicolas, ED, Virginia Tech

General manager: John Breitenbach
Jim Schwartz’s defense requires a pool of explosive edge rushers to stay fresh up front. Nicolas is raw and inconsistent, but could be eased into the rotation.

165. Kansas City Chiefs: Kyle Rose, DI, West Virginia

General manager: John Breitenbach

More defensive-line depth here for the Chiefs, who can use Kyle Rose at nose tackle and possibly five-technique. He might need some time in the weight room, but is good value at the end of the fifth round.

166. Houston Texans (from New England): Matt Judon, ED, Grand Valley State

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

Coming out of Division-II Grand Valley State, we had no data on Judon, but when our analysts watched his tape, he showed pass-rush potential off the edge as a 3-4 outside linebacker.

167. Arizona Cardinals: Aaron Wallace, ED, UCLA

General manager: Jordan Plocher

Wallace had a +12.2 pass-rush grade last season. He can provide the Cardinals with another edge rusher to substitute in and give Jones and Golden a breather.

168. Minnesota Vikings (from Carolina): Travis Feeney, ED, Washington

General manager: Sam Monson

Travis Feeney has two good seasons of grading at PFF. In each of the last two years, he was very good against the run, and in 2015, was much-improved as a pass-rusher, notching seven sacks and 37 total pressures on his rushes. He fits a versatile niche for the Vikings and would be a very useful depth addition.

169. Detroit Lions (from Denver): Bryson Albright, ED, Miami (OH)

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

A team can never have too many versatile defensive ends, and for the Lions, that holds true. Albright finished last year with a pass-rushing productivity of 11.6, good for 23rd in the country at his position.

170. Arizona Cardinals (compensatory selection): Cardale Jones, QB, Ohio State

General manager: Jordan Plocher

Jones has the size and strength that Bruce Arians likes in his QBs, but the former Buckeye’s -7.0 passing grade last season shows he needs work. Sitting behind Carson Palmer for three years will give Jones a great opportunity to learn from the Cardinals’ staff.

171. Seattle Seahawks (compensatory selection): Cory Johnson, DI, Kentucky

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Johnson’s run-stop percentage of 9.8 was tied for eighth-best in the class by an interior defender—along with DeForest Buckner.

172. Cleveland Browns (compensatory selection): KeiVarae Russell, CB, Notre Dame

General manager: John Kosko

Russell was suspended for 2014, but chose to come back in 2015 and was inconsistent. He shows some stiffness, but recovers quickly and doesn’t get fooled by double-moves.

173. Cleveland Browns (compensatory selection): Brandon Shell, OT, South Carolina

General manager: John Kosko

Outside of getting roughed up against Mizzou’s Charles Harris and Texas A&M’s Myles Garrett, Shell was really solid in pass protection. He’ll need development, but has upside to be a good OT and compete for the position vacated by Mitchell Schwartz.

174. San Francisco 49ers (compensatory selection): Keenan Reynolds, OW, Navy

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Reynolds earned the highest rushing-grade for a quarterback in this class last season. He likely doesn’t stay at QB, but is a big enough playmaker that we’re willing to gamble on him being a success somewhere.

175. San Diego Chargers (compensatory selection): Jakeem Grant, WR, Texas Tech

General manager: Nathan Jahnke

While he doesn’t have great hands, Grant has potential once he has the ball in open space. He could be used as a returner and have a small role in the offense, after leading the draft class with 875 yards after the catch.

Round 6

176. New York Giants (from Cleveland): Kenny Lawler, WR, California

General manager: Chris Phillips

Jared Goff’s top target last year has great size/speed and makes some of the most incredible catches you will see—but also drops some easy ones. If he can iron out the drops, he could be a huge steal.

177. Los Angeles Rams (from Tennessee): Austin Blythe, C, Iowa

General manager: Jordan Plocher

The Rams add another run-blocking interior linemen in Austin Blythe. Blythe had the second-highest run-blocking grade (+33.0) of any center in the draft class.

178. San Francisco 49ers (from Dallas): Jaden Oberkrom, K, TCU

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Many view Roberto Aguayo as the best kicker in this draft, but Oberkrom has a huge leg, going three-for-three on field goals of 50 yards or more in 2015.

179. San Diego Chargers: Trevone Boykin, QB, TCU

General manager: Nathan Jahnke

The Chargers lack a developmental quarterback on the roster, and Boykin was the top one available. He’s had two years of strong grading and deserves a chance to stick at QB.

180. Minnesota Vikings (from San Francisco): Connor McGovern, G, Missouri

General manager: Sam Monson

McGovern played tackle in college and has all of the athletic boxes ticked, but was beaten too often and may have a better future inside at guard. Far from a sure thing, but an interesting project player.

181. Jacksonville Jaguars: D.J. Reader, DI, Clemson

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

Reader played one-tech at Clemson, and will give the Jaguars some much-needed beef up front in the run game. He had three hurries and four run-stops in the National Championship game, and was a major headache all day for Alabama center Ryan Kelly.

182. Baltimore Ravens: Caleb Williams, G, Rice

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Williams played tackle at Rice and was the fourth-highest graded player at OT in the nation in 2014. He’s a better fit at guard, but did give up just six total pressures in that impressive 2014 campaign.

183. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Devon Cajuste, TE, Stanford

General manager: Michael Mountford

Converting Cajuste from WR to TE, he has the athletic ability to be a move-TE. Cajuste recorded 1.64 yards per route in 2015, which would have been ninth-best for tight ends in this class.

184. New York Giants: T.J. Green, S, Clemson

General manager: Chris Phillips

Green struggled at times in coverage last year (-10.8), as he was learning a new role in the Clemson defense. He could take some time to develop, but already has the size, speed, athleticism, and flashes the playmaking potential.

185. Chicago Bears: Teddy Ruben, WR, Troy

General manager: Matt Claassen

Ruben is small, but as a slot receiver he’s a polished route-runner and even better after the catch. He can also contribute as a returner, if needed. His 2.95 yards per route run out of the slot ranked sixth in the nation in 2015.

186. Miami Dolphins: Ronnie Harris, CB, Stanford

General manager: Wes Huber

Harris is a versatile coverage option who received little hype. Producing the 14th-best coverage production grade in the FBS last season, he will offer immediate passing-down work and the potential for much more.

187. Washington Redskins (from New Orleans): Jordan Payton, WR, UCLA

General manager: Michael Mountford

With both Pierre Garçon and DeSean Jackson in the final year of their contracts, Washington needs to start looking at WR. While getting a WR in the sixth round is not ideal, Payton does have the ability to be a possession target; it will be a surprise if he is anything more than that. The former Bruin finished with the second-highest WR grade in the FBS last season.

188. Philadelphia Eagles: Jacoby Brissett, QB, NC State

General manager: John Breitenbach

After landing a physically gifted passer at the top of the first round in Wentz, the Eagles add another developmental signal-caller in the sixth (this is assuming Sam Bradford or Chase Daniel will be moved prior to the start of the season). Brissett has plenty of potential, but needs the time Pederson would invest in developing him.

189. Dallas Cowboys (from Oakland): Clayton Fejedelem, S, Illinois

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Fejedelem’s 49 defensive stops led all safeties in this class, and he followed up his strong year with an interception at the East-West Shrine Game.

190. Los Angeles Rams: Chris Moore, WR, Cincinnati

General manager: Jordan Plocher

This was an all-offense draft for the Rams, and they add yet another receiving target for Goff here. Chris Moore is a proven deep-ball receiver with 445 yards last year coming on pass targets 20 or more yards from the line of scrimmage.

191. Detroit Lions: Jenson Stoshak, WR, Florida Atlantic

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

Stoshak is a versatile receiver that has experience both outside and in the slot. His 2.73 yards per route run from the slot was 11th-best in the nation last season.

192. Buffalo Bills: Cody Core, WR, Mississippi

General manager: Billy Moy

Wanted Jenson Stoshak here, but he was taken the pick before by the Lions. Core was an easy decision, though, once Stoshak was off the board; he’s a great athlete who has all of the tools to develop into a very good receiver, he just needs to clean up his route-running. Core was fifth among WRs in this draft class last season, with a 61.5 percent catch rate on balls that traveled at least 20 yards in the air.

193. Tennessee Titans (from Atlanta): Jihad Ward, DI, Illinois

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

Ward’s coming out party was at the Senior Bowl, and while his film doesn’t always match his week in Mobile, his body type, strength and quickness makes him an ideal rotational DE in Tennessee’s 34 defense. He was +18.8 in the last two seasons against the run and tallied 63 run stops.

194. Oakland Raiders (from Indianapolis): Reggie Northrup, LB, Florida State

General manager: Jon Abbott

Northrup is steady in run defense and projects at MLB, a position that the Raiders struggled with last season.

195. Houston Texans (from New York Jets): Adam Gotsis, DE, Georgia Tech

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

Gotsis is an intriguing prospect, as he’s from Australia and he graded well as a pass-rusher (+13.8) on only 377 snaps. With a 6-foot-5, 285-pound frame, he’s worth a late-round flier as a developmental 3-4 defensive end prospect.

196. New York Giants (from New England via Houston): Evan McKelvey, LB, Marshall

General manager: Chris Phillips

McKelvey is an athletic-looking LB, and could be a special-teams contributor right away. He graded out at +6.0 or above in each facet of play (coverage, run defense, and pass-rushing).

197. Tampa Bay Buccaneers (from Washington): Eddie Yarbrough: ED, Wyoming

General manager: Michael Mountford

Yarbrough is undersized, but if he can come in and be a third-down pass-rusher and start to bulk up, that is an upgrade for TB. Yarbrough graded as the 16th-highest edge defender last season.

198. San Diego Chargers (from Minnesota): Perez Ford, ED, Northern Illinois

General manager: Nathan Jahnke

Ford posted the 18th-highest pass-rush grade in the nation against lesser competition in college; he has the athleticism to make him an intriguing developmental pass-rusher in the NFL.

199. Cincinnati Bengals: Curt Maggitt, ED, Tennessee

General manager: Mike Renner

Maggitt may have gone much higher, had he not missed his senior year with a cracked hip. He was one of the most effective pass-rushers in the country in 2014 when healthy, and would be a perfect fit at strong-side linebacker.

200. Green Bay Packers: Mitch Mathews, WR, BYU

General manager: Mike Renner

Aaron Rodgers has never had a true jump-ball guy in his time in Green Bay. At 6-foot-5 with a 36-inch vertical, Mathews made his fair share of spectacular catches at BYU.

201. Jacksonville Jaguars (from Pittsburgh): Praise Martin-Oguike, ED, Temple

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

The Jaguars continue to stockpile pass-rushers. He totaled 13 sacks and 53 pressures in 2014 and 2015.

202. Detroit Lions (from Seattle): Luke Rhodes, LB, William & Mary

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

Rhodes is a bit of an unknown, coming from William & Mary. But with a need for inside linebacker, the Lions will be happy with his smooth technique against the run and ability to drop into coverage.

203. New York Jets (from Kansas City): Rees Odhiambo, G, Boise State

General manager: Zoltan Buday

Odhiambo will have to develop in run-blocking during his transition from tackle to guard in the NFL. However, he does have potential and had a slightly better pass-blocking efficiency (97.5) than Jack Conklin and Ronnie Stanley.

204. Chicago Bears (from New England via Chicago): Nick Vannett, TE, Ohio State

General manager: Matt Claassen

Vannett was a decent in-line run-blocker last season for Ohio State. He’s not that athletic, but is a developmental No. 2 TE that could work the underneath areas in the passing game.

205. Arizona Cardinals: Tom Hackett, P, Utah

General manager: Jordan Plocher

While the punt coverage rules aren’t the same from FBS to NFL, Hackett can still be an effective directional punter. He excels at pinning opponents deep, and had 28 punts downed inside the 20-yard line last season.

206. Chicago Bears (from Carolina): Prince Charles Iworah, CB, Western Kentucky

General manager: Matt Claassen

Iworah has a ton of speed, but is fairly raw and could benefit from more coaching. In 2015, he allowed a passer rating of 68.4 when targeted and a completion percentage of just 47.1.

207. San Francisco 49ers (from Denver): Will Parks, S/CB, Arizona

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Parks played in the slot and at safety over the past two seasons. He earned a +25.7 grade against the run, +24.1 in coverage. The former Wildcat doesn’t have a natural position yet, but a lot of talent.

208. New England Patriots (compensatory selection): Trevon Coley, DI, Florida Atlantic

General manager: Jordan Abbott

New England takes a shot at another interior rusher, hoping he sticks on the practice squad. Coley finished fifth in pass-rushing grades for draft-eligible, non-Power-5 interior lineman

209. Baltimore Ravens (compensatory selection): Tanner McEvoy, S, Wisconsin

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

McEvoy impressed after his move to defense in 2015, finishing the year with the fifth-highest coverage grade of any safety in this draft.

210. Detroit Lions (compensatory selection): Jerald Hawkins, OT, LSU

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

Hawkins is a tackle that has shown some promising ability at times, and at this point, is very low-risk. He allowed just 13 total pressures last season.

211. San Francisco 49ers (compensatory selection): Jake McGee, TE, Florida

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Okay, so he’s not a good blocker, but at +4.8, he did have the fourth-highest receiving grade of any TE in this class.

212. Dallas Cowboys (compensatory selection): Ben Braunecker, TE, Harvard

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Our only look at Braunecker was in the NFLPA Bowl, where he played 42 of 65 snaps. Braunecker wowed with his athletic testing prior to the draft, and is an intriguing developmental prospect for the Cowboys.

213. San Francisco 49ers (compensatory selection): Tyler Matakevich, LB, Temple

General manager: Gordon McGuinness

Matakevich is the 13th-highest-graded linebacker in this class, grading positively as a pass rusher, against the run, and in coverage.

214. New England Patriots (compensatory selection): Ian Wells, CB, Ohio

General manager: Jon Abbott

Wells has good length and excelled in press man-coverage, which the Patriots run most often. If he can improve his tackling, he should help out in New England.

215. Seattle Seahawks (compensatory selection): James Bradberry, CB, Samford

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Bradberry has played 234 snaps against FBS competition over the last two seasons (including the Senior Bowl). He earned a positive coverage grade in 2015, allowing only two catches for 26 yards in 56 snaps in coverage.

216. Dallas Cowboys (compensatory selection): DeAndre Washington, RB, Texas Tech

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Washington was a big-play threat for the Red Raiders last season, gaining 43 percent of his rushing yards on 25 carries of 15 yards or more.

217. Dallas Cowboys (compensatory selection): Vincent Valentine, DI, Nebraska

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Maliek Collins gets much of the attention, but Valentine has put in two strong seasons for the Cornhuskers, impressing in particular against Wisconsin (+3.8) and UCLA (+4.2) in his final season for Nebraska.

218. Buffalo Bills (compensatory selection): Rashard Robinson, CB, LSU

General manager: Billy Moy

The Bills were very much hoping to address the RT spot in this draft; Conklin was my primary target in Round 1, but the chips just didn’t fall that way. Instead of spending a pick here on a tackle I have little-to-no hope for, I went with a talented (but troubled) CB in Robinson. Robinson has loads of upside, and if he can get his act together, he could be one of the steals of the draft.

219. Denver Broncos (compensatory selection): Juston Burris, CB, NC State

General manager: Sam Monson

With a little more development to his game, Burris has the size and measurables to be a top corner. He posted back-to-back solid seasons in PFF coverage grades.

220. Pittsburgh Steelers (compensatory selection): Matt Weiser, TE, Buffalo

General manager: Bobby Slowik

Weiser offers more as a pass-catcher than anyone else this late in the draft. He had 304 yards after the catch and forced 10 missed tackles.

221. New England Patriots (compensatory selection): James Burgess, LB, Louisville

General manager: Jon Abbott

New England likes to look for core special-teamers in these late rounds. Burgess has shown good open-field tackling ability. Combine that with a 4.61 40-yard dash time and high grades in run defense, and he should be a solid developmental project.

Round 7

222. Tennessee Titans: Vadal Alexander, G, LSU

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

The Titans would have preferred to address the O-line earlier, but Alexander is a solid value at this stage with potential versatility. He graded positively on run-blocks in both 2014 and 2015.

223. Cleveland Browns: Miles Killebrew, S, Southern Utah

General manager: John Kosko

Taking a flyer on Killebrew—who comes from an FCS school—in the seventh round is easy when he sports a +4.7 overall grade in the three graded games we have on him. Big, fast, and physical, Killebrew can develop into either a FS or a SS.

224. San Diego Chargers: Caleb Azubike, DI, Vanderbilt

General manager: Nathan Jahnke

He has the ability to play multiple spots across the line, which is something the Chargers value, and can join the rotation after posting positive grades as a pass-rusher and in the run-game.

225. Seattle Seahawks (from Dallas): Josh Ferguson, RB, Illinois

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Another running back for Seattle might raise eyebrows, but Ferguson’s work as a receiver (786 receiving yards in two seasons, 23 missed tackles forced) offers a potential point of difference to the powerful runners in the Seahawks’ backfield.

226. Jacksonville Jaguars: Jhurell Pressley, RB, New Mexico

General manager: Josh Liskiewitz

One of the better athletes of the RB class, Pressley averaged 7.6 yards per carry and 3.8 yards after contact over the past two years for New Mexico.

227. Miami Dolphins (from Dallas): Josh Gordon, ED, Minnesota State

General manager: Wes Huber

Hailing from a Division-II program, Gordon simply shredded NSIC competition. His tape is very impressive, and he will have ample time to develop his overall game.

228. Denver Broncos (from San Francisco): Alex Balducci, DI, Oregon

General manager: Sam Monson

DeForest Buckner isn’t the only talent from that Oregon D-line, and Alex Balducci has been a quietly impressive run-defender, with some potential to be more. He adds depth to an already quality rotation.

229. Pittsburgh Steelers (from New York Giants): Tyvis Powell, S, Ohio State

General manager: Bobby Slowik

Powell helps to continue backfilling the Steeler’s secondary. He shows ability in space, but needs to shore up his 28 missed tackles from the past two years.

230. New England Patriots (from Chicago): Mike Hilton, S, Mississippi

General manager: Jon Abbott

Hilton played all over the Ole Miss secondary, and had the third-best coverage grade of all CB/Ss in 2015. He’s not fluid in coverage, but can improve if he finds a spot on special teams.

231. Miami Dolphins: Dak Prescott, QB, Mississippi State

General manager: Wes Huber

Ryan Tannehill has a secure grasp on the position, but Prescott is an athletic project for Miami in the seventh round. He’ll have time to work on passing mechanics and, combined with Zeke and Morgan in the backfield, offer an instant Kordell Stewart-like impact within short-yardage packages.

232. Washington Redskins (from Tampa Bay): Eric Striker, ED, Oklahoma

General manager: Michael Mountford

Striker is a one-dimensional pass-rusher. If he is able to play on third down and attack the QB, he could become dangerous, notching 50 total pressures last season (third-most for all 3-4 OLBs in the draft).

233. Philadelphia Eagles: Victor Ochi, ED, Stony Brook

General manager: John Breitenbach

For a small-school prospect like Victor Ochi, stepping up to the level of competition at the Shrine Game was a necessity. Ochi was one of the best players that week. Adding him improves the depth on the Eagles’ defensive line.

234. Oakland Raiders: Kenneth Farrow, RB, Houston

General manager: Jon Abbott

Has good vision and has smooth quick cuts. Graded 5th overall in pass protection for all draft eligible RBs

235. New York Jets (from Los Angeles via Houston via Denver): Ben McCord, TE, Central Michigan

General manager: Zoltan Buday

While McCord is a liability as a run blocker, he is a good athlete and finished with the third most yards after catch in this year’s tight end class with 260 yards.

236. Detroit Lions: D.J. Pettway, EDGE, Alabama

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

Pettway adds solid defensive end depth for the Lions. He graded positively in pass rush and run defense in each of the past two seasons.

237. New Orleans Saints: Alex McCalister, EDGE, Florida

General manager: Thomas Maney

Neglecting interior OL, instead throwing another dart at a pass rusher. Productive in limited snaps over two seasons. 27 total pressures, +7.9 pass rush grade in 187 rushes last season.

238. Atlanta Falcons: D.J. Foster, WR, Arizona State

General manager: Steve Palazzolo

Foster is a running back/slot receiver hybrid who brings versatility to an offense. Drops were an issue last year as he had nine on only 68 catchable attempts, but he can make defenders miss in space as evidenced by his 13 forced missed tackles on only 59 receptions.

239. Indianapolis Colts: Joey Hunt, C, TCU

General manager: Bryson Vesnaver

The Colts need interior offensive lineman, both starters and depth. While Hunt may not be a starting center right away, his +26.5 grade last season (fifth among centers) proves he can be effective.

240. Minnesota Vikings (from Buffalo): Okezie Alozie, LB, Buffalo

General manager: Sam Monson

Hard-hitting college safety that projects to linebacker at the next level. Can match up well in coverage and could develop into a good WLB with coaching.

241. Kansas City Chiefs (from New York Jets): Brennan Scarlett, DI, Stanford

General manager: John Breitenbach

Another versatile defensive lineman, Scarlett can compete for a roster spot at defensive end.

242. Washington Redskins: C.J. Johnson, LB, Mississippi

General manager: Michael Mountford

Limited playing, might be a one or two down thumper, but if he can play effectively/back up LB he will have some value. Johnson had a run stop percentage of 12.2 — eighth-best in the draft

243. New England Patriots (from Houston): Owen Williams, DI, Tennessee

General manager: Jon Abbott

While the Patriots are likely to trade one or more of these later picks into next year (only five in 2017). They grab a big-bodied project with Williams to provide depth likely on the practice squad.

244. Minnesota Vikings: Charone Peake, WR, Clemson

General manager: Sam Monson

The Vikings take a shot on some talent late in the draft with Peake. He has speed, and some ball skills, and is the type of player that could easily stick on a roster and outperform their draft slot.

245. Cincinnati Bengals: Dakota Gordon, FB, San Diego State

General manager: Mike Renner

One of the few teams that still utilizes a full-back. Gordon was by far our highest-graded lead blocker in the FBS each of the past two seasons.

246. Pittsburgh Steelers: Jamal Palmer, EDGE, Baylor

General manager: Bobby Slowik

Palmer is on the smaller side for an OLB but had one of the better pass rush grades left available at this point in the draft with 6 sacks, 10 hits, and 46 hurries.

247. Seattle Seahawks: Nick Arbuckle, QB, Georgia State

General manager: Ben Stockwell

Arbuckle’s accuracy percentage of 75.9 ranked fifth in this year’s draft class.

248. Green Bay Packers: Christian Hackenberg, QB, Penn State

General manager: Mike Renner

Mike McCarthy is renowned for his QB School and ability to develop the most important positioning on the field. If anyone can tap the Penn State quarterback’s potential, it’s him.

249. Kansas City Chiefs: Josh Forrest, LB, Kentucky

General Manager: John Breitenbach

The seventh round is all about special teams. Forrest is a good run defender and can contribute in the third phase immediately.

250. New England Patriots: Cory Littleton, EDGE, Washington

General manager: Jon Abbott

Talented pass rusher, but very small in stature and can’t stand up to the run. Could develop/make the practice squad if he can perform on special teams

251. Philadelphia Eagles (from Arizona): Boomer Mays, LB, Northern Illinois

General manager: John Breitenbach

Questions abound about the Eagles’ linebacker corps. Mays can backup Jordan Hicks and fits the style of player Schwartz looks for.

252. Minnesota Vikings (from Carolina): Lachlan Edwards, P, Sam Houston State

General manager: Sam Monson

Jeff Locke. Need I say more.

253. Denver Broncos: Jalen Mills, CB/S, LSU

General manager: Sam Monson

This year’s Mr. Irrelevant is a player many have off the board long ago. Denver halt his slide and kick the tires on a prospect others have rated much higher than the grading.

  • theotherJimBrown

    Wow ! PFF has the Browns trading north-west-east-south on day two. End up getting two receivers (Higgins, Braverman), tight end (Hooper), running back (Prosise) and maybe the best developmental quarterback in this draft (Kessler). Now that’s how you restock a putrid offense.
    Hope they are right on the receivers. Rashard Higgins doesn’t seem like a possible WR1, let alone a day 1 starter. We already have Andrew Hawkins and Taylor Gabriel for the slot. Maybe Braverman knocks off Gabriel or maybe we go west coast with a bunch of midgets running circles around some linebackers underneath.
    The day one starter would be Prosise. Think he can beat Isaiah Crowell in camp. Hooper could be invaluable as a blocker/ safety valve. Even though I don’t think our starting o-line will be as bad as most think from losing Alex Mack and Mitchell Schwartz. There definitely is no bench and PFF gave us no o-line picks. Puzzling.

  • Craig W.

    Pick 252 might by my favorite. Locke hurts field position so often.

  • Jaxon65

    So the Panthers traded their whole draft to move up in the 1st round to draft a player they could have had at #30? I’ll keep it simple…dumb. Why bother with this joke of a mock?

  • Tony Pearson-Clarke

    The real-life draft should be interesting. The draft boards and mock drafts have varied so much; I can’t recall a previous draft class that generated such differing opinions. I’m curious as to whether any of them will be even close.