PFF scouting report: Matt Skura, C, Duke

Mike Renner and the PFF draft analysts break down the play of Duke's Matt Skura ahead of the 2016 NFL draft.

| 8 months ago
INDIANAPOLIS, IN - FEBRUARY 26: Offensive lineman Matt Skura of Duke in action during the 2016 NFL Scouting Combine at Lucas Oil Stadium on February 26, 2016 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

INDIANAPOLIS, IN - FEBRUARY 26: Offensive lineman Matt Skura of Duke in action during the 2016 NFL Scouting Combine at Lucas Oil Stadium on February 26, 2016 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

PFF scouting report: Matt Skura, C, Duke


Below is the PFF draft profile for Duke’s Matt Skura, which incorporates PFF’s college grades and scouting intel from our team of analysts. To see all of PFF’s 2016 scouting reports, click here.

Position fit:

Center or guard; gap scheme

Stat to know:

Third-highest graded center in the FBS

Combine stats:

Height: 6-3
Weight: 305
Arm length: 35 ¼ inches
Hand size: 10 inches
40-yard dash: 5.39
Bench: 27
Vertical jump: 24 inches
Broad jump: 8-7
3-cone drill: 7.89
20-yard shuttle: 4.76

What he does best:

• Uses his length extremely well for a center. When he locks out on defenders they have little hope of recovering
• Strength on double teams is superb. Likes to stick on them and carry defensive tackles up to the second level
• Great patience at the line of scrimmage on inside zone. Doesn’t lunge out at defensive tackles, instead he reacts to their
movement and rides them out of the play
• Locates well at the second level. Great understanding of attack angles on linebackers

Biggest concern:

• Average athlete that may be scheme-limited. Wasn’t asked to block much more than straight ahead in Duke’s run game
• Competition in the ACC was underwhelming. Faced little in the way of NFL level strength
• Rare that he would turn and/or gain the angle on defensive tackles. Could have issues against head up nose tackles and two-gappers.

Player comparison:

Joe Berger, Minnesota Vikings. Both are gap scheme fits at either guard or center with their length and size. Skura has the potential to develop into a plus run blocker similar to Berger.

Bottom line:

There are a lot of question marks in Skura’s game simply because he was never asked to do them at Duke so we’ve never seen them. His production and consistency make him an intriguing middle-round prospect.

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