Offensive Packages

| October 3, 2013

packagesEach team likes to go about things in a different way. Whether it be how they attack free agency, employ personnel, or even (as we’ve found out with our relationship with teams) use analytics.

While most of that is behind the scenes, one of the areas we can break down with the use of our player participation collection, is to look at what offensive packages teams use. It’s more often than not how the offense lines up that dictates what defense comes onto the field, and it’s for that reason it’s important to understand what packages teams prefer.

The Primary Packages

The first thing to say is that the NFL clearly favors three packages: 11 personnel (one back, one tight end, and three receivers), 12 personnel (one back, two tight ends, and two receivers) and 21 personnel (two backs, one tight end, and two receivers). The table below that indicates the league average for each:

11 Personnel 12 Personnel 21 Personnel
51.62% 19.74% 13.26%

The most notable exceptions to this come from certain teams. The San Francisco 49ers, for example, use 22 personnel (one receiver) on 25.95% of plays. That’s substantially more than the second-highest usage of this package from the Seattle Seahawks (17.92%), and way above the league average here at 5.87%.

The only other team to use a different package on more than 10% of their plays has been the Arizona Cardinals who utilized a four-receiver set with one back on 15.24% of plays. The league average is 1.43%.

But enough spiel. You came here to see how your team fares, so here’s a table with the package percentages for the three main packages for every team (numbers represent percentages).

Team
11
12
21
ARZ46.4720.827.43
ATL59.6314.0714.81
BLT57.9510.9321.19
BUF58.6517.3118.59
CAR41.3537.0211.54
CHI41.5724.7217.23
CIN39.7042.321.12
CLV51.8634.588.47
DAL50.3737.690.00
DEN69.5120.330.00
DET66.4324.553.61
GB84.404.133.67
HST23.3642.0622.12
IND43.1712.2311.87
JAX47.3914.5520.52
KC44.7812.1216.84
MIA64.2917.866.35
MIN35.9718.9725.30
NE46.0812.0918.63
NO42.7613.7923.10
NYG69.6514.798.17
NYJ43.5615.5121.78
OAK28.1710.7136.11
PHI80.2816.550.00
PIT65.6313.2810.55
SD66.9111.769.19
SEA40.5015.7712.90
SF28.6311.8324.81
SL62.0225.440.35
TB56.4716.9112.95
TEN46.9322.3811.19
WAS52.2822.8120.70
Average51.6219.7413.26

If you’re interested in more information regarding your team, @PFF on twitter is the place to go to.

 

Follow Khaled on Twitter: @PFF_Khaled

  • Jason Williams

    this website is awesome. man i love you guys…

  • LightsOut85

    Not regarding this article specifically – but is there a way to ask Q outside of twitter? I rarely find them answered from here in the comments, or on the Facebook page. Twitter is just too restrictive (length wise) for most of my questions. (I miss the forum, or even the “contact us” section).

    • LightsOut85

      I’ll try to ask: Off hand do you have the numbers for past years? I’d be curious to know NE’s 12 (2TE)% for ’10-11, when they had both their pro-bowlers. While it’s near impossible to get 2 TE that good (fingers crossed for Gates & Green in SD), that seems like the hardest personnel group to defend against if you manage it (and thusly, that they’d have used it a LOT).

      • Ogi

        They used Hernandez as a receiver in many of those 12 personnel plays, so that might not be the original 12, more like 11 and a half, with Aaron usually being lined up in slot, or even going wide.

        • LightsOut85

          That’s WR by formation – this is personnel. He if he & Gronk were on the field (& no other TE), it would be a 2 for the TE. That’s regardless of where they line up. You could have a “heavy” 11 formation where all the WR are lined up tight or in the backfield & it’s still an 11 personnel group.

  • JW_Redmon

    Thanks for the article/information – I hope you do one on the defensive side too.

  • Jeff

    Great information, thank you. Indy’ numbers only total around 66 percent. I assume they run alot of 22 as well?

    How do you identify the “elephant” package?