QB Pressure Profiles: AFC West

| July 6, 2013


We’re back at it again with a deep dive into the PFF Database as we continue to reveal a plethora of numbers regarding pressure and its effect on the quarterback. To recap, in the last few months we’ve looked at pressure’s impact on the passer from different angles and from that data, drew the conclusion that the left tackle might be overrated. From there, we broke it down by quarterback and revealed the league’s best and worst when pressure comes from different places. Now it’s time to take the next step and look at “pressure profiles” for every quarterback in the league.

As always, sample size caveats apply in some cases, but the numbers draw from our five years of data going back to 2008. There are certainly trends for some quarterbacks, while others are a bit more scattershot in their performance when pressure comes from different angles.

When looking at the numbers, keep in mind that the PFF Grade is the best indicator of a player’s performance, as we isolate the quarterback’s impact on every single play. If he throws a wide receiver screen that goes for an 80-yard touchdown, the numbers will look pretty, but the QB is credited with the same grade he would earn if it was stopped for no gain. Similarly, a perfectly thrown pass that should be a first down but is dropped and intercepted will likely earn a positive grade despite the ugly INT in the stats. All of the stats are nice to get some perspective, but PFF Grade always trumps as more reliable.

With that said, let’s take a look at the quarterbacks from the AFC West and how they fare under pressure. (You can check out the previous stops here: AFC East, AFC North, AFC South)

Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos
Strength: Interior Pressure
Weakness: Edge Pressure

As I mentioned in one of the previous articles, the handling of pressure is one area where Manning and Tom Brady differ. Manning does well against interior pressure so the way to get to him is through the tackles. That’s his only real weakness as he grades positively against most other types of pressure including an impressive +4.6 when facing heat from multiple spots. His +10.2 grade against any pressure ranks third in the league while his +137.0 grade against no pressure ranks fifth, though he’d be in the top two or three had he not missed the entire 2011 season.

Pressure
Dropback
Comp%
Yds
Yds/Att
TD
INT
Sack%
Knockdown%
PFF Grade
QB Rating
ALL271067.43%196567.5141602.6%8.4%147.297.8
NP204571.13%157777.7127350.0%0.0%137.0107.2
P66554.59%38796.6142510.5%34.3%10.265.3
LT13851.94%6835.3495.8%32.6%-7.348.7
LG7957.89%6058.0213.8%27.8%5.486.8
C3260.71%1826.5016.3%21.9%4.064.9
RG9853.93%5996.7148.2%31.6%4.560.1
RT9651.16%5656.6369.4%28.1%-4.454.7
TE1950.00%1549.62015.8%36.8%1.6123.4
RB2162.50%1449.01119.0%38.1%1.586.5
QB4100.00%55.00075.0%75.0%-1.287.5
MUL11857.61%6096.61121.2%49.2%4.676.8
UNB6052.73%3336.1028.3%33.3%1.356.1

 

Phillip Rivers, San Diego Chargers
Strength: Interior Pressure
Weakness: Unblocked

It surprised more than a few fans when I revealed that Rivers has been the best in the league against interior pressure since 2008 but it speaks to how effective he’s been throughout his career. He certainly took a step back in 2012, perhaps due to the loss and regression of two of his favorite weapons in Vincent Jackson and Antonio Gates. The one place Rivers has really struggled has been against unblocked pressure and it may be a similar situation to Joe Flacco’s, which I mentioned the other day. Both quarterbacks play in a vertical offense that may not have the hot routes and check downs necessary to handle the unblocked defenders.

Pressure
Dropback
Comp%
Yds
Yds/Att
TD
INT
Sack%
Knockdown%
PFF Grade
QB Rating
ALL295964.51%220268.1149725.9%11.7%120.496.7
NP200870.73%172528.7120470.0%0.0%137.1107.7
P95148.06%47746.4292518.3%36.3%-16.867.8
LT18851.30%8995.86616.0%31.4%-2.165.9
LG8561.97%6048.5139.4%28.2%7.176.3
C5460.42%4188.7305.6%20.4%5.0109.5
RG9354.32%6137.63010.8%23.7%4.891.2
RT14050.45%7076.45517.1%28.6%-1.966.9
TE3943.33%2508.33020.5%33.3%0.2106.3
RB4842.86%2216.31127.1%45.8%3.861.7
QB2120.00%91.80071.4%76.2%-15.039.6
MUL15544.90%5705.83332.9%57.4%-6.661.2
UNB12829.82%4834.2479.4%38.3%-12.330.8

 

Alex Smith, Kansas City Chiefs (New)
Strength: LG
Weakness: C

The Chiefs’ new signal caller has shown improvement in recent years and he’ll be asked to take the reins of new Head Coach Andy Reid’s pass-first offense. Smith has posted a -3.3 grade when pressure comes from center while holding his own with a +0.3 grade when it comes from left guard. He’s yet another quarterback who is capable of making plays when given time to throw, so Kansas City’s underrated offensive line could make it a smooth transition.

Pressure
Dropback
Comp%
Yds
Yds/Att
TD
INT
Sack%
Knockdown%
PFF Grade
QB Rating
ALL163361.66%100967.067327.4%15.4%17.788.8
NP106168.64%78127.652220.0%0.0%39.298.8
P57244.34%22845.5151021.2%44.1%-21.564.0
LT7042.86%3096.32025.7%44.3%-1.777.7
LG4950.00%2015.31216.3%40.8%0.352.6
C3946.67%1424.71215.4%41.0%-3.344.0
RG4948.65%2486.72014.3%36.7%-0.288.6
RT9349.21%3926.23122.6%37.6%-0.278.3
TE2060.00%18812.50015.0%35.0%1.6104.2
RB3539.13%1104.80122.9%40.0%0.936.5
QB2116.67%221.80042.9%66.7%-5.039.6
MUL8332.65%2404.90134.9%57.8%-8.341.2
UNB11345.45%4324.46310.6%43.4%-5.665.7

 

Matt Flynn, Oakland Raiders
Strength: Not enough snaps
Weakness: Not enough snaps

We don’t have enough snaps to gauge strengths and weaknesses for Flynn, but we’ve posted the numbers anyway for the Raiders’ top option to start at quarterback this season. Flynn has taken a couple strong relief outings and turned them into potential starting gigs, though he was beaten out by Russell Wilson in Seattle last season, and he won’t have anything handed to him in Oakland either.

Pressure
Dropback
Comp%
Yds
Yds/Att
TD
INT
Sack%
Knockdown%
PFF Grade
QB Rating
ALL15962.14%10837.7958.2%17.0%-0.292.6
NP11366.97%8417.7530.0%0.0%2.493.9
P4645.16%2427.84228.3%58.7%-2.684.9
LT1345.45%312.81015.4%46.2%-1.182.8
LG50.00%00.00140.0%60.0%-2.20.0
RG1100.00%11.0100.0%0.0%0.5118.8
RT625.00%143.50016.7%33.3%-0.341.7
RB466.67%9832.71025.0%100.0%1.3149.3
QB40.00%00.000100.0%100.0%-2.20.0
MUL875.00%7719.31037.5%75.0%1.1156.3
UNB540.00%214.2010.0%40.0%0.313.3

 

Follow Steve on Twitter.

 

  • Andrew

    What jumps out at me the moust is Payton having only 4 pressures
    attributed to himself over 4 seasons of play. 4 dropbacks out of 2710
    total. Wow.