Signature Stats Snapshot – Pass Blocking Efficiency

| September 30, 2011

What time is it?  Signature stat time, that’s what.
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And this week we’ve looked our technical team up in a room, slipped some bread under the door along with a jug of water and demanded some offensive line stats.
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Well, the team delivered and, with that in mind, we can roll out some real time, live Pass Blocking Efficiency through three weeks. No longer must I try to get to grips with Excel, because all the info is right there along with a host of other stats that take full advantage of the unique data here at PFF.
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Okay – was that last plug a little too strong?  Apologies, I’ll get to why you came here.
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The only trouble here was deciding where to start. Would I look at the individual, or the collective? Well, being the nice guy I am I’ve only gone and done both. To preface your thanks, you are most definitely welcome.
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Before we go on, let’s get the boring math out of the way.  Pass Blocking Efficiency equals the total number of pressures (with hurries and hits valued at three quarters the worth of sacks) taken away from number of snaps in pass protection (or cumulative for offensive line), and then divided by the snaps in pass protection.  The result?  The higher the number the better.  Simple enough.
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Up first let’s have a look at the teams, and see who are the top dogs?  Well if you follow us on twitter, it was mentioned that last week the Bills were top of the pile, and after that victory over the Patriots, nothing has changed.  They’re still at No.1 with just 12 total pressures given up, including just the one sack (Erik Pears to Tamba Hali).  That’s quite a turnaround for a unit that ranked 20th in the same category last year.
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Another team moving on up are the rarely spoken about Tennessee Titans.  Last year they finished 19th, with Michael Roos still failing to live up to the hype he earned in 2008, and David Stewart having a down year (and oh yeah, the interior was ridiculously bad).  This year?  They’re up in second, making them therefore the best team in a competitive AFC South that follows up with Houston in third, and Jacksonville a surprise in fourth.
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Now it should be mentioned, and this is something we ourselves are looking into, just how quickly teams get rid of the ball as a determining factor in how a team can prevent pressure from getting to the QB.  But credit to all these teams and offensive lines for keeping their quarterback off the ground.  A reminder as well, this is just looking at offensive line pressure allowed, and not those that comes from ‘skill position’ players or unblocked rushers.  Anyway, here’s the Top 10:
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Top Offensive Lines – Pass Blocking Efficiency

Rank

Team

Sacks

Hits

Hurries

Total Pressure

Pass Blocking Efficiency

1

BUF

1

4

7

12

95.3

2

TEN

1

4

8

13

94.4

3

HST

2

3

15

20

92.3

4

JAX

4

5

10

19

91.7

5

NE

0

8

16

24

91.4

6

GB

2

3

17

22

90.8

7

KC

3

2

15

20

90.3

8

SD

4

3

22

29

89.3

9

DET

5

7

17

29

88.9

10

DAL

1

3

26

30

88.3

 

So, take a bow guys, you’re Top 10 for a reason.  Now you need to keep it there and avoid the mistakes other teams have made.  What teams you ask?  Well let’s start with Atlanta.  Poor old Matt Ryan.  19 times he’s hit the turf already courtesy of his offensive line, with Sam Baker being the chief culprit.  Baker was a first rounder, but has never played like it, giving up three sacks and five hits already this year.  The rest of the line has been much better – which is to say they’re only below average.
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They’re not the only team slipping, with the Miami Dolphins line responsible for 26 occasions Chad Henne was taken to the ground.  Ouch.  13 of those have come from the tackles, and shockingly Jake Long has given up eight of them.  These are crazy times we’re living in, though it should be noted Long looks to be feeling the lingering effects of injury.
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Anyway, all this negative talk is depressing me.  I’ll give you the list and move onto some positives.  That’ll turn my frown upside down.
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Bottom Offensive Lines – Pass Blocking Efficiency

Rank

Team

Sacks

Hits

Hurries

Total Pressure

Pass Blocking Efficiency

32

ATL

9

10

34

53

78.2

31

MIA

10

16

27

53

79.4

30

SEA

9

15

17

41

81.3

29

ARZ

4

2

35

41

81.5

28

MIN

7

5

27

39

81.9

27

CLV

1

11

32

44

82.8

26

DEN

6

8

27

41

83

25

TB

2

3

35

40

83.4

24

SL

9

5

26

40

83.6

23

WAS

7

7

26

40

84.6

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Now we get to some individuals.  And firstly, let’s take a look at those franchise left tackles.  For those of you expecting to see a list headed by Jake Long and Joe Thomas, prepare to be shocked and amazed.  Well, maybe not that amazed since I mentioned in the last paragraph that Long has given up eight hits (10 total pressures).  In any case, top of the charts is former laughing stock Demetrius Bell.  Even if the LT benefits from the Bills’ quick-pass style, it should be noted just how much he has improved since his disastrous 2009.
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Similarly, Eugene Monroe was walking that “bust” tightrope after giving him up far too much pressure in his first two years.  Well he looks to be turning a corner, though we eagerly await the “Freeney Test” he has so often failed.  Very encouraging for the future of the Jaguars’ offensive line.  The rest of the Top 5 isn’t exactly filled with names you’d expect to see.  But here they are:
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Top Left Tackles – Pass Blocking Efficiency

Rank

Name

Team

Pass Pro Snaps

Total Pressure

Pass Blocking Efficiency

1

Demetrius Bell

BUF

114

3

98

2

Eugene Monroe

JAX

79

2

97.8

3

Matt Light

NE

135

5

97.2

4

Duane Brown

HST

100

4

97

5

Jermon Bushrod

NO

140

6

96.8

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Meanwhile, the bottom of the list is exactly what you’d expect to see.  Namely, the aforementioned Sam Baker.  He got beaten badly by Trent Cole and followed it up by making rookie Adrian Clayborn look like a world-beater.  He’s gone from disappointment to liability and may be one of the biggest reasons the Falcons have failed to live up to their preseason hype.  Elsewhere, another tackle who was humbled on Sunday Night Football makes an appearance with Jonathan Scott having some tricky times against Freeney (and others).
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Bottom Left Tackles – Pass Blocking Efficiency

Rank

Name

Team

Pass Pro Snaps

Total Pressure

Pass Blocking Efficiency

32

Sam Baker

ATL

135

21

87.8

31

Jonathan Scott

PIT

120

15

89.6

30

Levi Brown

ARZ

94

12

89.9

29

Charlie Johnson

MIN

94

10

91.5

28

Chad Clifton

GB

113

12

91.8

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Over on the right side, it’s great to see David Stewart back to his best.  The Titans’ tackle has allowed just two pressures (only one of which was a QB hit) all year. Packers fans will be hoping that Bryan Bulaga can return quickly and show no lingering effects of the injury that knocked him out of the Bears game.  His performance is a massive improvement on displays where he had among the worst ratings in the league.
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Top Right Tackles – Pass Blocking Efficiency

Rank

Name

Team

Pass Pro Snaps

Total Pressure

Pass Blocking Efficiency

1

David Stewart

TEN

117

2

98.7

2

Erik Pears

BUF

113

3

97.8

3

Tyron Smith

DAL

121

6

96.3

4

Khalif Barnes

OAK

71

4

95.8

5

Bryan Bulaga

GB

82

5

95.4

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Who are the guys not doing so good?  Miami fans will be utterly shocked (note the sarcasm) to find out who is at the bottom.  Marc Colombo, fresh off a good old-fashioned whoopin’ courtesy of Jabaal Sheard “leads” the way.  The faith in him, and decision to place him in the line-up, may go down as the straw that broke the camel’s back when it comes to the reign of Tony Sparano.  One of the more interesting names in the Bottom 5 is that of Michael Oher.  Excellent as a rookie right tackle, it seems the flip-flopping between positions has resulted in some severe consequences.  Did he peak in year one?
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Bottom Right Tackles – Pass Blocking Efficiency

Rank

Name

Team

Pass Pro Snaps

Total Pressure

Pass Blocking Efficiency

28

Marc Colombo

MIA

126

18

89.1

27

Brandon Keith

ARZ

104

14

89.4

26

Phil Loadholt

MIN

94

12

89.9

25

Wayne Hunter

NYJ

123

15

90.2

24

Michael Oher

BLT

119

14

91

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Moving on to the interior and a look at the guards as a collective before my editor admonishes me any more for exceeding my word limit.  Credit firstly to the two guards who haven’t given up any pressure in the ever-excellent Marshal Yanda, and improving Mike Pollak.  Pollak has played fewer snaps for sure, but quarterbacks hate not being able to step up into the pocket, and these guys are keeping their quarterbacks happy.  An indirect, if extremely valuable skill set.
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Top Guards – Pass Blocking Efficiency

Rank

Name

Team

Pass Block Snaps

Total Pressure Allowed

PBE

1t

 Marshal Yanda

BLT

119

0

100

1t

 Mike Pollak

IND

71

0

100

3t

 Kris Dielman

SD

132

1

99.4

3t

 Jake Scott

TEN

117

1

99.4

5t

 Andy Levitre

BUF

114

1

99.3

5t

 Josh Sitton

GB

113

1

99.3

7t

 Brian Waters

NE

129

2

98.8

7t

 Stephen Peterman

DET

124

2

98.8

9t

 Leroy Harris

TEN

114

2

98.7

9t

 T.J. Lang

GB

113

2

98.7

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Down at the bottom, that move for Colombo hasn’t just impacted the right tackle spot for the Dolphins.  Vernon Carey hasn’t exactly played like a natural guard and has given up 11 pressures through two and a bit games.  If it wasn’t for the super-reliable Zane Beadles (reliable in that you can rely on him to give up pressure) he’d be at the bottom on his own, as opposed to equally last.
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Bottom Guards – Pass Blocking Efficiency

Rank

Name

Team

Pass Block Snaps

Total Pressure Allowed

PBE

58t

 Zane Beadles

DEN

119

13

91.2

58t

 Vernon Carey

MIA

97

11

91.2

57

 Anthony Herrera

MIN

94

9

92.6

56

 Stefen Wisniewski

OAK

85

7

93.8

55

 Chris Chester

WAS

123

10

93.9

54

 Travelle Wharton

CAR

130

9

94.4

52

 Justin Blalock

ATL

135

9

94.8

52

 Richie Incognito

MIA

126

8

94.8

51

 Daryn Colledge

ARZ

104

7

95

50

 David Diehl

NYG

96

5

95.1

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And now lastly (far too small a sample size to look at skill position guys being left into block) we’re onto the centers.  Only two haven’t given up any pressure.  The underrated Matt Birk, and a Scott Wells who is fast turning into one of the best centers in the game.  An interesting note for Jets fans is that despite being atrocious with his run blocking, Colin Baxter has given up just one pressure.  Meanwhile, Nick Mangold (who didn’t play enough snaps to qualify for this study) gave up five pressures including two sacks.
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Top Centers – Pass Blocking Efficiency

Rank

Name

Team

Pass Block Snaps

Total Pressure Allowed

PBE

1t

 Matt Birk

BLT

119

0

100

1t

 Scott Wells

GB

113

0

100

3t

 Nick Hardwick

SD

132

1

99.4

3t

 Dominic Raiola

DET

124

1

99.4

5

 Colin Baxter

NYJ

67

1

98.9

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Taking a look at the centers who are at the bottom, it’s interesting to see three new starters.  Joanthan Goodwin and his replacement Olin Kreutz both rank lowly, while Phil Costa isn’t just having problems timing the snap of his ball.
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Bottom Centers – Pass Blocking Efficiency

Rank

Name

Team

Pass Block Snaps

Total Pressure Allowed

PBE

31t

 John Sullivan

MIN

94

5

95.5

31t

 Jonathan Goodwin

SF

88

5

95.5

30

 Lyle Sendlein

ARZ

104

6

95.7

29

 Phil Costa

DAL

106

6

95.8

28

 Olin Kreutz

NO

96

5

96.1

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So there you have it.  A whole host of Pass Blocking Efficiency for you.  There are always mitigating circumstances for why some do badly, with quarterbacks that hold onto the ball.  It’s why you should always trust our grading over any stat, as that takes into account how quickly and badly a tackle is beaten.  But if you want some hard, objective numbers for tackles … well, enjoy.  There’s a lot that we can learn from these.
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Follow Khaled on Twitter: @PFF_Khaled … and be sure to follow our main Twitter feed: @ProFootbalFocus . .
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  • sgtrobo

    column headers next time! Good stuff. Shocked not to see Pittsburgh listed as one of the worst, although I see Heath Miller credited with a sack and 3 pressures allowed, so that put Pit’s OL just under the “Mendoza” line, so to speak

  • asspadtycoon

    I can’t believe that we were just destroyed by the only team ranked lower than us! I can assure you that St Louis has the highest salary to lowest performance ratio in the league by far.Our tackles were drafted #2, and #33 overall and our interior guys are at the top of the salary range for their positions. What do Mark Bulger, Kurt Warner, and Jim Everett have in common? They are all QB’s who’s career with the Rams was ended because they became shell-shocked. Let’s hope that Sam Bradford’s name is not added to this list.